Course Descriptions

Academic Affairs

School of Arts & Sciences

School of Business

School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences

Graduate Academic Programs


Foundations Courses*

CIS101 Foundations of Information Systems and PC Applications (3 hours)

This course is a survey of fundamental functions of a computer, Internet, file management, and an introduction to the Microsoft Office Suite.  this course does not count for credit toward graduation.

Offered through Online and Off-Campus Programs

ENG100 Introduction to Writing * (3 hours)

This introductory reading and composition course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses on developing academic reading skills, integrating reading comprehension with academic writing, and writing effective sentences and paragraphs.  These skills are essential to all academic disciplines.  The first half of the course will provide basic reading instruction, emphasizing reading strategies and academic vocabulary.  The second half of the course will provide instruction in sentence writing that will culminate in the writing of a coherent paragraph.  Placement based upon university assessment.  this course does not count for credit toward graduation.  Students must receive a grade of "C" or better in the course to enroll in ENG140.

Offered Fall, Spring

MAT100 Foundations of College Mathematics* (3 hours)

An algebraic foundation course covering algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, graphing in the Cartesian plane, and solving algebraic applications. This course does not count for credit toward graduation.  Must receive a grade of “C” or better to enroll in MAT173. Individuals who have earned credit in College Mathematics or higher level mathematics may not earn credit in MAT 100.

Offered Fall, Spring

MAT173 College Mathematics* (3 hours)

An applied approach to traditional algebra topics including linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, and radical expressions. Emphasis will be placed on application problems. This course does not count for credit toward graduation.  Must have a grade of “C” or better to enroll in MAT174/MAT181.

Prerequisite: MAT100 (“C” or better) or placement

Offered Fall, Spring

* Foundation courses meet eligibility for financial aid and athletics, but do not fulfill graduation requirements.  Students required to take these courses may need to attend an additional semester to meet graduation requirements

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Freshman Studies Program (FRE)

FRE100 Freshman Seminar (1 hour)
The course is a continuation of the Freshman Institute and will provide an in-depth introduction to college life, college realities, college expectations, study skills and time management. All students enrolled in their first semester of college will participate in this course. Pass/Fail.
 
Offered Fall, Spring

FRE150 LEAP Seminar (3 hours)

The Learning Enrichment Academic Program [LEAP] seminar identifies and assists academic at-risk students to help learn about and adjust to college life during the fall semester. The program consists of three components: Freshmen Seminar, Developmental English, and Life Lessons. Must have a C or better.

Offered Fall

EXP101 Exploring Your Future (1 hour)

This course is designed to assist students who are undecided on their major or who are exploring their career options.  The course seeks to identify how knowledge, skills, and values are matched to major and career choices.  It will expand the student's knowledge of major, occupational, and career opportunities and to find the career path that is the best fit.  this is a graded course.

Prerequisite: FRE100/150

Offered Spring

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Honors Program

Participation in the Freshman Honors Program includes enrollment in a sequence of four courses designated as the Intellectual Core, as well as one Honors Special Topics course.  The four Core courses each substitute for a specific General Education course requirement.
 
ART190H Honors Introduction to Theatre (3 hours)

Examines the ways in which different understanding of truth, knowledge, and morality are expresses in the Fine Arts.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program   

Offered Fall

CUL290H Special Topics (3 hours)
Examines interpretations and applications of the ideas of truth, knowledge and morality across time and in a variety of cultural settings.  This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program

Offered Spring

ENG290H Honors Literature (w) (L) ( 3 hours)
Pursues the concepts and ideas related to and questions about the natures of truth, knowledge and morality in the context of critical theoretical approaches in literature. 
This is a writing intensive course.  This course may meet one of the graduation requirements for ENG 142 or Literature in the General Education Core.
Prerequisite:
Admission to the Freshman Honors Program  

Offered Spring

HIS170H Honors History (w) (3 hours)
Examines interpretations and applications of the ideas of truth, knowledge and morality across time and in a variety of historical settings.  This is a writing intensive course.
 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program   
 
Offered Spring

HON290H Honors Special Topics (3 hours)
This is a seminar-style course that explores a unique topic or issue developed from the program core courses in consultation between program faculty and particip
ants.

Prerequisite: Completion of all honors program core courses and 2nd year student in Honors Program.  

Offered Fall

NAT180H Honors Science (3 hours)
Focuses on the nature of scientific inquiry, in general, as a method of acquiring an understanding of our physical reality, and offers a  contrast of science to other "ways of knowing." 
 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program   
 
Offered Fall
 
PHI120H Honors Philosophy (3 hours)
Provides a foundation of concepts related to and questions about the natures of truth, knowledge and morality that are addressed from alternative perspectives in the other honors program courses. 
 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program   
 
Offered Fall
 
SOC190H Honors Sociology (3 hours)

Examines the ways in which different understandings of truth, knowledge, and morality are expressed in the study of sociology.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program   

Offered Fall

THR190H Honors Introduction to Theatre  (3 hours)

Students do not have to be actors to take this course.  This course is a study of theatre as an art form, in conjunction with its nature and practice, along with the artists who work in the theatre and the nature of their work.  Students will gain hands-on experience in theatre production by taking part in Tiffin University's fall production.  They will also learn to appreciate and critique theatrical productions by attending and discussing two live productions.  From reading, attending class sessions, responding critically to live performances, and participating in one production, students will develop an appreciation for the many facets of theatre, along with the various types of work that contribute to the overall success of theatrical productions.  Since this is an honors course, the tasks assigned for Tiffin's fall production will be more time consuming than those assigned in other theatre courses.  All students will be required to take on a role in stage crew, such as props, as well as paint and tear down the set after the production.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Freshman Honors Program  

Offered Fall


Adolescent and Young Adults (EDA)

Lourdes University Adolescent and Young Adults (EDA)

210 Teaching Adolescents and Young Adults  (3 hours)
Provides students with opportunities to examine the developmental needs and unique aspects of educating adolescents and young adults and how schools and teachers effectively respond to such needs. Students will not only examine the history and philosophy of adolescent education but will also explore the latest theories regarding learning and effective instructional practices

Prerequisites: EDU100

235 Curriculum & Instruction for Adolescents & Young Adults (3 hours)
Builds on the general concepts presented in EDA 225, Teaching Adolescents and Young Adults, by providing students with opportunities to plan curriculum and instruction, which is developmentally appropriate for adolescents and young adults. This course will begin to bridge the gap between content and practice.

Prerequisites: EDA225, EDU250 and Permission of education advisor.

250 General Teaching Methods and Field Experience I (3 hours)
Provides students with opportunities to learn and practice the skills and competencies of effective teaching at the adolescent (secondary) level. This course will examine various instructional methods used to teach adolescents and young adults in the student’s chosen concentration area and will provide students with actual field experience in teaching.

Prerequisites: EDU100, EDA225, EDU230, EDU250, EDA235, permission of advisor

351 Social Studies Methods and Field Experience II (3 hours)
Offers students opportunities to learn and practice the skills and competencies of effective teaching of Social Studies at the adolescent (secondary) level. This course will examine various instructional methods used to teach Social Studies and will provide students with actual field experience in teaching Social Studies.

Prerequisites: EDU 100, EDU 230, EDU 250, EDU 316, EDU 318, EDA 225, EDA 235, EDA 250, admission to education program and permission of advisor. Required Field Base Experience.

353 Language Arts Methods and Field Experience II

Provides students with opportunities to learn and practice Adolescence to Young Adult language Arts pedagogy.  Students will engage in all elements of the Teacher Performance Assessment, including planning instruction and assessment, instructing and engaging students in learning, assessing student learning, and final retrospective reflection.  This course includes an extensive field experience in an Adolescent Young Adult language Arts setting.

Prerequisite: EDA250

450 Adolescent and Young Adult Student Teaching (12 hours)
Provides students with an opportunity to put into practice the skills and competencies of effective teaching of adolescents. This course is the culminating experience in the student’s educational program. This course will include experiences and practices in an Adolescent and Young Adult Classroom along with weekly seminar sessions.

Prerequisites: completion of all professional education and curriculum content courses, permission of the education advisor. Required Field Base Experience

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Adolescent and Young Adults (EDM)

Lourdes University Adolescent and Young Adults (EDM)

210 Education for Young Adolescents (3 hours)
Fosters an understanding of the unique developmental needs and aspects of young adolescents.  This course will examine not only the history and philosophy of meddle school education but will explore exemplary practices, which are characteristics of effective middle childhood education.

Prerequisite: EDU250 or concurrent

235 Integrated Curriculum & Instruction in the Middle School  (3 hours)
Explores theories, issues, research, resources and exemplary practices, which promote developmentally appropriate education for the young adolescent.  Students will observe and examine how integrated curriculum and instruction uses the unique needs and interests of young adolescents and promote the development of basic skills as well as critical thinking skills, problem solving and creativity.  Topics include: student centered curriculum, interdisciplinary learning, assessment, and developmentally appropriate instruction.

250 Middle Childhood Methods & Field Experience I  (3 hours)
Provides students with opportunities to learn and practice the skills and competencies of effective teaching of young adolescents.  This course will examine methods of developing appropriate experiences in all four curriculum content areas and reading in the Middle Childhood program.

350 Middle Childhood Methods & Field Experience II  (3 hours)
Reinforces instructional methods and focuses on the two (2) areas of curriculum concentration selected by the student.  Students will participate regularly in a young adolescent classroom along with a weekly class reinforcing such topics as planning appropriate responsive experiences, classroom management, learning styles, parent issued, mainstreaming, interdisciplinary teaming, integration, professionalism, creating assessment materials, and technology.

Prerequisites: EDU100, EDU250, EDU230, EDM225 and cumulative GPA 2.50. Qualifying test scores.

450 Middle Childhood Student Teaching  (12 hours)
Provides students with an intensive opportunity to put into practice the skills and competencies of effective teaching of young adolescents.  This course is the culmination of all Professional Education and Curriculum Content courses, which comprise the Middle Childhood Education Program.  This course will include experiences and practices in a Middle Childhood setting along with weakly seminar sessions.

Prerequisites:  Permission of EDM Advisor, BATE 2, EDM350, EDU318 and completion of all content course work.  Required Field Base Experience.

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Adolescent and Young Adults (EDU)

100 Foundations of Education (3 hours)

Offers historical, philosophical, political and social overviews of education. Students will examine how schools are organized, administered and financed. In addition, students will explore and experience the skills and competencies (ten performance standards) necessary to be an effective teacher. Legal issues such as the Professional Code of Ethics, legal rights of teachers and their legal responsibilities will be addressed.

Required Field Base Experience. Must pass with a ‘C’ or better.

101 Foundations of Education Bridge Course (1 hour)

This course is intended for students transferring in EDU100 from other colleges and universities. EDU101 provides students with an understanding of the requirements and expectations of the Lourdes University Department of Education.  This course will focus specifically on the program requirements such as, but not limited to, the assessment gates and teacher development portfolio.  Students will be required to participate in a two-day field experience if they have not had a field experience as part of their EDU100 transfer course.

150 Introduction to Technology in Education (3 hours)

Provides practical skills in various ways to incorporate technology into the student’s personal educational program as well as integrating instructional technology into the classroom. Must pass with a ‘C’ or better.

218 The Role of Phonics in Emergent Literacy (3 hours)

Integrates cognitive and language development in children and across cultures, the linguistic aspects of language (content), and pedagogy or the teaching of phonics (theory and research) and its role in emergent literacy (reading).  The focus is on the physiological, developmental, and sociological aspects of cognition and receptive and expressive language.  The course uses the Ohio Academic Content Standards as the basis for curriculum development of literacy approaches and content in early childhood and middle school classrooms.

Prerequisites: ENG141 and ENG142

230 Survey of Special Needs Education (3 hours)

Focuses on the foundations of special education with emphasis on historical back-ground, legal issues, a positive learning environment, disabilities and health disorders in a regular/inclusive classroom, as well as developing teaching skills for use in an inclusive classroom. Must pass with a ‘C’ or better.

Prerequisites: EDU100, EDU250, permission of education advisor.

250 Educational Psychology (3 hours)

Addresses the foundation of Educational Psychology. Four major areas will be explored: general overview of psychology, life span development, human learning, and behavioral issues and problems. Must pass with a ‘C’ or better.

Prerequisites: EDU100 and permission of education advisor

312 Teaching Reading Through Literature for Young Adolescents (3 hours)

Focuses on the acquisition and development of reading skills, and the nature, implementation and process of reading instruction through literature.  Students study the psychological and linguistic foundations of reading instruction with emphasis on the value of reading aloud to learners and strategies and skills needed to encourage and motivate students to pursue and respond to reading and writing.  The course presents a practical study of fiction and nonfiction literature for young adolescents, including a study of literary elements, reading strategies, the implementation of flexible literacy programs, critical evaluation of texts and their use in the classroom.  It also examines ways that various factors, such as content, purpose, tasks, settings, and cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity influence the reading process.    

Prerequisites: Permission of EDM advisor, ENG200 and EDU218.

316 Multicultural and Social Issues in Education (3 hours)

Gives an overview of the interaction of school and society. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the social issues affecting education and the appropriate role and response of school and teacher.

Prerequisites: EDU100, junior standing, permission of education advisor.

318 Classroom Management and Behavioral Issues (3 hours)

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective learning environment and to deal appropriately and effectively with behavioral issues within the classroom setting. The course covers both legal and ethical implications and provides practical management techniques.

Prerequisites: EDU100, permission of the education advisor.

328 Integration of the Arts in Instruction (3 hours)

Explores theories, issues, research, resources and exemplary practices, which promote aesthetic education for children. Students will explore and experience how the visual arts, music, performing arts and dance can be integrated across the curriculum, using the unique needs and interests of students and promoting the development of basic skills as well as critical thinking skills, problem solving and creativity.

Prerequisites: EDU100, EDM225 (EDM majors only), permission of education advisor

330 Developmental Reading Through Content Area Reading (3 hours)

Focuses on reading as a tool for constructing meaning from text by accessing prior knowledge, applying schema, developing a purpose for reading, and emphasizing the value of reading aloud to learners. A basic understanding of the reading process combined with the application of reading strategies to build knowledge of study strategies will be examined. Explores questioning techniques, and cognitive processing in the comprehension of narrative and expository text to enhance the quality of life.

332 Reading Diagnosis and Assessment (3 hours)

Focuses on reading as a tool for constructing meaning from text by accessing prior knowledge, applying schema, developing a purpose for reading, and emphasizing the value of reading aloud to learners.  A basic understanding of the reading process combined with the application of reading strategies to build knowledge of study strategies will be examined.  Explores questioning techniques, and cognitive processing in the comprehension of narrative and expository text, application of readability factors to the content textbook, study/learning strategies for the teacher and the student, and techniques for developing higher level thinking skills. 

Prerequisites: through Gate 1 and accepted into the Department of Education, permission of education advisor, EDE250, EDM250, EDA250.

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3 Art(ART)

120 Two-Dimensional Foundations (3 hours)

In this hands-on introductory course, students will use two-dimensional media to learn specific techniques for creative problem solving, and methods to increase visual creativity and perception.  Students will explore the elements and principles of visual design including (but not liminted to) line, shape, color, texture, value, composition and space using graphite, inks, charcoal, and acrylic paint.  Students are exposed to the role of two-dimensional art in contemporary society.  Problem solving on an individual and group level is stressed.

Offered Fall, Spring

130 Three-Dimensional Foundations (3 hours)

This hands-on, introductory course will introduce studnets to the language and experience of three-dimensional form.  Assisgnemtns will encourage students to develop concepts, work through ideas, to experiment, and to embrace risks in the design process.  Both traditional as well as non-traditional three-dimensional media will be emphasized.  Students are exposed to the role of three-dimensional concepts as a basis for sculpture, architecture, and industrial design.  Problem solving on an individual and group level is stressed.

Offered Fall

190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)

These courses offer students topics of special interest that will increase knowledge and understanding of a particular subject area in the visual arts. Problem solving on an individual and group level will be stressed. Research and basic computer imaging applications will be incorporated in various assignments.  May or may not be writing intensive.  

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.


201 Introduction to Art History (3 hours)

This course is an introduction to the history of art and covers works from the Prehistoric through the Modern Period. Painting, sculpture, architecture and design, as well as contemporary works that cross various disciplines, will be explored within the context of the world and how art defines societies and cultures. Students will learn to describe and analyze various artistic periods, styles, and movements that have influenced contemporary art and culture. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing and interpreting works of art using established guidelines and terminology.  Lab fee $15.  

Prerequisite: ENG142      Offered Fall   

210 Art Appreciation (3 hours)

This foundational art history course introduces students to the vocabulary of the art world, explores methods and processes used in the creation of artistic and culturally significant objects and styles, and addresses the historical and aesthetic importance of art within a multi-cultural context.

Prerequisite: ENG142   

Offered Fall

220 Digital Design (3 hours)

This introductory course will investigate the basic mechanics of visual perception using digital design tools.  Focus will be on the formal properties of design including space, line, plane, mass, shape, texture, and color; and the organizational fundamentals of unity,balance, rhythm, and movement.  Emphasis will be given to the principles of planning and visual thinking needed to communicate ideas.  Problem solving on an individual and group level will be stressed.  Lab fee $40.

Offered Fall, Spring

310 American Art (3 hours)

This course addresses the material culture of what is now the continental United States.  Material culture in this context emphasizes painting, sculpture and architecture, but also explores the decorative arts and crafts, from 1500 to the present.  The course traces the development of the visual arts and the historical references associated with the arts in the United States.  Emphasis will be placed on learning to identify and interpret artists, styles and international influences.  

Prerequisite: ENG142       

Offered Spring odd numbered years  

320 New Media Arts (3 hours)

This course examines the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical foundations of new media art-making.  Students explore the form and space of new media images through a wide variety of materials and media, including creating and editing digital images, audio, and video, and embedding multimedia in Web pages.  The course emphasizes strategies for idea generation and story-telling on multiple platforms through hands-on production of new media art combined with discussion of its place in contemporary society.

Prerequisites: ART220, COM134 or permissin of the instructor

Offered Spring Odd Numbered Years

340 Topics in Art History (w) (3 hours)

Students in this course engage in an in-depth study a specific topic, time period or genre of art history. Topics may include the history of photography, Modern art, American art, or others as determined by the instructor, and will rotate each time the course is offered. Emphasis will be placed on exploring different art historical methodologies, as well as understanding the importance and impact of the course theme on the study of art history as a whole. This is a writing intensive course. 

Prerequisites: ENG142 with a C or better

Offered Spring

391 Independent Study (3 hours)

Individual directed projects. Requires written approval of the instructor to register for the course.

Prerequisite: ENG142 and one of ART101, 102, 110, or 210    

Offered as needed

392 Advanced Studio Practice (w) (3 hours)
 
Students will explore different media and develop their studio art skills. Emphasis will be placed on critiques and creative problem-solving, and on developing a working creative process. Students will also develop a long-term project that will result in a final portfolio.

Prerequisites: One or more from ART101, ART102, ART110, Art 120 ART130  

Offered Spring even numbered years

ART415 Art, Audience and Community (3 hours)

This course is an overview of organizational practices and theory related to audience development in non-profit arts organizations. Students will examine the different contexts in which we find visual art, including museums, galleries, public art and community-based projects. We will discuss audience participation and the factors determining audience perception, decision making, and reception of these different art forms. Students will collaborate with the Diane Kidd Gallery during the many phases of an exhibition, including curating, installation, and marketing. The course encourages students to recognize and implement innovative opportunities for reaching target audiences. This course may involve field trips.

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 

Arts & Sciences (SAS)

465 Managing the Arts (3 hours)

This course provides an overview of the conceptual and practical structures of arts management for not-for-profit cultural organizations with some attention paid to the for-profit marketplace. Serving as an introduction to the workings of arts organizations, including boards, fundraising, grant-writing, non-profit organizations, artist representation, programming, and audience development, the course gives practical applications of arts management for gallery administrators and performing arts presenters.

Prerequisite: MGT201 and one from ART201 or MUS223 or THR222 

Offered Spring odd numbered years

470 Internship  (3 hours)
The internship requires fieldwork in an agency appropriate to the student's career objectives. This course is required for psychology and arts administration, general sciences and psychology majors. The course is a choice with SAS 499 Senior Seminar for the Communication, English, and History majors. This is a writing intensive course for General Science Majors.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of the School Dean or Designee

499 Senior Seminar (3 hours)
Students will pursue individual projects in a group setting. An interdisciplinary perspective is encouraged. Bachelor of Arts degree candidates only.

Prerequisite: BA Degree Candidates-Senior Status

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Biology (BIO)

101 Contemporary Biological Problems (3 hours)
An introductory course that stresses the principles of biology and pertinent applications to increase appreciation and to demonstrate that biology is a science relevant to everyday life. The following topics will be covered: cells, genetics, evolution, diversity of life, plant and animal structures and functions, and ecology. There is a lab component to this course.

Offered Fall and Spring semesters

101L Contemporary Biological Problems Lab (1 hour)

Lab fee $30

Offered Fall and Spring semesters

310 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours)

This is an advanced course that will provide an understanding of the human anatomy and how the body functions.  The course will cover basic anatomical and directional terminology; fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology; histology; the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems; special senses; and the endocrine system; the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; the gastrointestinal and the urinary system; the reproductive and developmental processes.  The course will review the application of these concepts in the identification, diagnosis and treatment of diseased condition and will also cover selected topics on clinical case studies.   There is a lab component to this course.

Prerequisites: BIO101 and CHM132

310L Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab (1 hour)

Lab fee $30

Offered Fall and Spring semesters

333 Genetics (3 hours)

This course is an introduction to the concepts of genetics.  The course will cover the basic fundamentals of genetics and their applications.  It will cover the current principles of heredity including gene structure, function, regulation and gene transfer.  Other areas will include DNA technology, genomics, heritable diseases and population genetics, quantitative genetics, and evolutionary genetics. There is a required lab component to this course.

Prerequisites:  NAT114, BIO101

Offered Spring

333L Genetics Lab (1 hour)

This laboratory will cover principles of Mendelian inheritance, drosophila genetics and other biotechnology processes applied in the field of genetics.  The students will be expected to apply the principle covered in lecture to processes in the lab.

Lab fee $30

Offered Spring

373 Microbiology (3 hours)

This is an introductory course that will provide an understanding of the key microbiological concepts including the basic characteristics of microorganisms as well as the relationship between microbes, humans and their environment. The course will review the application of these concepts in the identification, prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and will also cover selected topics on microbial agents with emerging trends in microbiology. Throughout the course both harmful and beneficial aspects of microorganisms will be covered. There is a required lab component to this course.

Prerequisites: BIO333

Offered Spring

373L Microbiology Lab (1 hour)

This one credit laboratory component will cover basic techniques in microbiology such as methods of staining and the microscopic, colonial and biochemical identification of microorganisms as well a pure culture techniques.

Lab fee $30

Offered Spring

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Chemistry (CHM)

131 General Chemistry I  (4 hours)|
A first semester course in general chemistry.  Topics covered include molecular theory, atomic structure, gasses, aqueous solutions, thermo-chemistry, bonding, and molecular geometry.   Lab required.

Prerequisite: MAT174/181 or Permission   

Offered Fall

131L General Chemistry I Lab (1 hour)

A lab is required for the corresponding course unless a lab was previously completed with a grade of "C" or better. Lab fee $30.

132 General Chemistry II (4 hours)
This second semester course includes topics on organic chemistry, solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.   Lab required.

Prerequisite: CHM131    

Offered Spring/Fall

132L General Chemistry II Lab (1 hour)

A lab is required for the correspinding course unless a lab was previously completed with a grade of "C" or better.  Lab fee $30.

Offered Spring

190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)

Topics will vary.

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

331 Organic Chemistry (4 hours)
The study of organic chemistry including the structure and nomenclature of organic compounds.  Topics will consider both the theoretical and experimental approaches to organic compounds.  Lab required.

Prerequisite: CHM132    

Offered Fall

331L Organic Chemistry I Lab (1 hour)

A lab is required for the corresponding course unless a lab was previously completed with a grade of "C" or better.  Lab fee $30.

Offered Fall

CHM332 Organic Chemistry II (3 hours)

This course will serve as an introduction into the advanced concepts of organic chemistry and will serve as the chemistry requirement for the general science major,  for the middle school certification program, and for the forensic science program.  Students will be expected to apply these concepts in the required lab.

Prerequisites:  CHM331

Offered Spring

CHM332L Organic Chemistry II Lab (1 hour)

A lab is required for the corresponding course unless a lab was previously completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better. Lab fee $30.

Offered Spring

CHM381 Quantitative Analysis (3 hours)

This course will serve as an introduction into the basic concepts of analytical techniques.  Students will be expected to apply concepts learned in General Chemistry.  The techniques and skills developed in the required lab will be essential for CHM481.

Prerequisites: CHM132

Offered Fall

CHM381L Quantitative Lab (1 hour)

A lab is required for the corresponding course unless a lab was previously completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better. Lab fee $30

Offered Fall

CHM411 Biochemistry (3 hours)

This course will serve as an introduction into the basic concepts of biochemistry.  This includes the study of principal types of biochemical compounds, nature of reactions taking place in plant and animal tissue and functions of enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleotides in the metabolic control of these processes. The student will be expected to apply concepts learned in Biology and Chemistry.  There is no laboratory requirement.

Prerequisites:  BIO101 (with a ‘C’ or better) and NAT310 and CHM332

Offered Spring

CHM481 Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

This course will serve as a complement to the Quantitative Analysis course.  The course focuses on the analytical techniques that use instrumentation that is most generally found in the laboratories today.  Students will be expected to apply concepts learned in Quantitative Analysis and General Chemistry.  Lab required.

Prerequisites: CHM381

Offered Spring

CHM481L Instrumental Analysis Lab (1 hour)

A lab is required for the corresponding course unless a lab was previously completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better. Lab fee $30.

Offered Spring

back to the top Communication (COM) 130 Introduction to Speech Communication (3 hours) A course in spoken communication, emphasizing public speaking and group presentations.  A series of practical exercises and three speeches are required of all students. Prerequisite::  ENG141 or concurrent         Offered Fall, Spring   134 Digital Photography (3 hours) Introduction to black and white and color photography in its applications as fine art and visual communication.  Introduction to computer editing software.  Lab fee at the discretion of the instructor, not to exceed $50. Prerequisite: Quality digital camera required (3.0 megapixels or more, 4.0 or above recommended). Offered Fall, Spring   190, 290, 390, 490 Speical Topics (3 hours) Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive. Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of course. 204 Visual Communication, Graphics and Presentational Strategies (3 hours) This course explores visual design, graphics and presentational strategies by introducing students to digital photography and layout and design skills. Students will learn digital and graphic design techniques using the leading industry software applications for desktop publishing and graphics illustration. Students will incorporate visual expression techniques and presentational strategies to produce brochures and newsletters. Prerequisite: COM 130     Offered Spring odd   212 Introduction to Public Relations (w) (3 hours) Survey of the theory, philosophy, and function of public relations practices and programs in American institutions with special attention given to public relations in various fields. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG141 Offered Fall     218 News Writing (w) (3 hours) Methods of gathering and evaluating news and writing typical news stories. Practice work covering assignments and preparing copy. This is a writing intensive course. Orerequisite: ENG141 Offered Fall    235 Sport Writing for Marketing and Promotions (3 hours) This course is designed to assist students in understanding the importance of writing in reaching mass audiences; to understand dealing with the media; and to learn types of writing common to the sports field. In addition, the course will distinguish between entry level and management level roles in sports marketing and review basic principles of public relations as they relate to the sports industry. Students will gain exposure to writing, preparing, and/or editing sport news releases, fact sheets, profiles, radio and television promos, brochures, media guides, schedule cards, fundraising proposals, and releases for community and special events. Students will learn the fundamentals of pitching stories; meeting deadlines, web layout for the Internet, conducting press conferences; and preparing for a potential crisis. Prerequisite: ENG141     Offered Spring even numbered years   241 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 hours) A survey course examining the various media (i.e., newspaper, radio, television, film, etc.) comprising the mass media in contemporary American society. Emphasis is given to the history, structure, and potential effects of each medium. Prerequisite: ENG141 or concurrent Offered Fall odd numbered years   300 Communications Research Methods and Information Sources (w) (3 hours) This is an introductory research methods course for all Communication majors. It is designed to teach students search strategies in mass communication that will help them identify primary and secondary sources that match information needs and to use this information for responsible media decision making. Students will learn how to gain access to these sources and retrieve information through a variety of approaches, including using electronic data bases. Students will design a final project that emphasizes the computer-assisted research methods learned throughout the course. Prerequisite: COM 130  and MAT 273   Offered Spring odd numbered years   310 Human, Interpersonal and Small Group Communications (3 hours) This course explores three related disciplines of communication as they pertain to the basic process of human interaction, both interpersonally and in small groups. Students will survey some of the main theories of human communication, including those that explain the processes involved in dyadic relationships, self-disclosure and listening. These principles will be integrated into larger communication contexts in order to understand how decision-making and problem solving occurs in small groups. Prerequisite: COM 130     Offered Fall odd numbered years   318 Feature Writing (3 hours) Newspaper features and special articles for general circulation magazines, business, and trade journal sources, materials, markets, and other factors pertinent to nonfiction writing.  Students will analyze and write a variety of types of feature stories. Prerequisite: ENG141  Offered Spring   320 Argument/Persuasion Theory and Practice (3 hours) The course develops understanding of theories of and critical attitudes toward argument and persuasion in formal and informal situations. Exercises include preparation, analysis, and criticism of arguments and oral argumentation and persuasive messages, persuasive campaigns, and media persuasion. Prerequisite: COM 130     Offered Fall even   324 Communicating across Cultures (w) (3 hours) Introduction to the study of cultural and intercultural theory and behavior, discussion of various culturally specific patterns of communication. This is a writing intensive course. Offered Fall even numbered years   329 Writing for Electronic Media (w) (3 hours) Introduction to writing styles and techniques used in electronic media. Includes creating copy for advertising, promotion, and news, and scripts for media programs. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG141   Offered Spring even numbered years   330 Video Production  (3 hours) Finding, producing, directing, scripting, and editing magazine style/documentary short stories. Interviewing techniques will be stressed. Pre-production, production, and post-production processes will be covered. All students will be required to produce their own story.   Offered Spring even numbered years   340 Law and Communications (3 hours) Survey of laws and regulations concerning mass media. Includes material on First Amendment, libel, invasion of privacy, freedom of information, copyright, obscenity, advertising and broadcast regulation. Prerequisite: Junior Standing     Offered Fall even numbered years   341 Political Communication (w) (3 hours) Examination of how interpersonal, group, and mass communication processes intersect political processes. A focus on the ways communication constructs political expectations and practice. This is a writing intensive course. Offered Fall even numbered years   410 Advanced Reporting (w) (3 hours) The purpose of this course is to give students training in news reporting and gathering methods. Course is a continuation of 218 and will give students further instruction in news story development and writing, as well as interviewing and note taking skills, as students pursue their own news stories. Students will be required to produce several, in-depth news stories and will explore Computer-Assisted Reporting methods. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM218     Offered Spring even numbered years   416 Public Relations Cases, Campaigns and Non-Profits (3 hours) This course covers the theory and practice of producing the public relations material used in campaigns to promote and interpret personal, institutional and organizational objectives and activities. This will include an exploration of the challenges non-profit organizations face in analyzing and executing public relations strategies to achieve organizational goals and objectives. Students will work with a client in researching and apply problem-solving techniques to an actual case for a major project. Prerequisite: COM 130     Offered Fall odd numbered years   438 History and Tradition of American Journalism (w) (3 hours) This course explores the cultural, intellectual and social history of journalism in America: the impact of new technologies for gathering and disseminating news; popular expectations about the duties and uses of the press and the business of journalism. Examines the press’ role in war, reform movements, political exercises, and other historic events. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG141 and Junior standing     Offered Spring even numbered years   441 Organizational Communication and Conflict Resolution (3 hours) This advanced course examines interpersonal and group relationships and patterns of communication within organizations. This includes the way individuals relate to each other personally, in groups and as leaders and followers. The course is competency based, the material is designed to increase knowledge, create an awareness of values, and build sensitivity to the different situations organizations face in an increasingly complex social, cultural and economic world. Conflict as a communications phenomenon is also explored. By the end of the courses students will have an understanding of the challenges of communicating within an organization and possess the skills necessary to analyze and address organizational communication issues. Prerequisite: COM130 (or COM241 for DCP) Offered Spring odd numbered years 450 Critical Analysis of Mass Media (w) (3 hours) This course provides an introduction to and application of media ethics and critical theory approaches to mass media. Issues may include globalization, identity, power, consumerism, ideology and hegemony in contemporary media. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG141, COM241     Offered Spring odd numbered years back to the top Cultural Studies (CUL) 190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours) Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive. Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.    210 Comparative Cultures (3 hours) Introduces the concept of culture, discusses its role in a society, and explores different manifestations of culture. This course may discuss culture in microcosm or macrocosm. Prerequisite: ENG141     Offered Fall   220 Religions of the World (3 hours) A survey of the prominent religions that influence the lives of people around the world. Prerequisite: ENG141    Offered Fall   250 World Cultural Geography (3 hours) This course exposes students to cultural variation found around the world. It will investigate changes in populations, human migratory patterns, language, religion, social customs, economic systems, and cultural interaction. Prerequisite: ENG141  Offered Fall even numbered years   300 Our Cultural Heritage (w) (3 hours) Through an interdisciplinary approach the student comes to understand the influence of cultural backgrounds on modern humanity. Topical areas vary. This is a writing intensive course.  Prerequisite: ENG142    Offered Spring   312 Middle Eastern Cultures (3 hours) This is a survey course of Islamic cultures around the world with emphasis on Arab Islamic culture. The course includes study of the religion itself, the accommodations made in various countries to local customs/conditions and comparisons among them. It also addresses the similarities/differences between Western culture and Muslim culture, including legal systems, church/state relationships and core values. Prerequisites: ENG142, one history course, and junior standing     Offered Spring even numbered years   313 East Asian Cultures (3 hours) This course is an in-depth study of the geography, social mores, religious beliefs of the people who make up the region known as East Asia. Prerequisites: ENG141   Offered Spring as needed   351 History of Film in Society (3 hours) This course examines the role that the medium of motion pictures played in society from the 1890s to present. It emphasizes the development of film as a predominantly American art form that had world-shaping ramifications. The influence of international film styles, notably German Expressionism, and other innovations of American film will be studied to provide a context for the growth of the American film canon. Prerequisite: ENG 142     Offered Fall even numbered years   352 Film Genre and History This course examines the role of genre in shaping the medium of motion pictures. It emphasizes the technological, artistic, and corporate developments that made film a significant part of the American and world culture. Emphasis is on the development of film through societal and other changes and showcases the significance of genre in the cinematic canon. While many genres will be examined, two will be emphasized, and the transgression of genre borders will be discussed. Prerequisite: ENG 142     Offered Spring odd numbered years 375 Exploring America’s Historical Cities (3 hours) In the same tradition as our Education Abroad programs, CUL 375, Exploring America’s Historical Cities will be a domestic program of studying away from the Tiffin Main Campus and Ohio itself.  Each year a different city will be the subject of cultural, historical, and environmental study.  The cities studied will vary but may include New Orleans, Washington, D.C., Boston, Chicago, and others.  The cities may rotate in sequence. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, and be in good standing. 410 Gender, Culture, and Visual Art (w) (3 hours) This course will explore the production and performance of gender in the visual imagery of art, pop culture and mass media.  This visual culture includes not only the world of fine art, but also film, television, music videos, video games, and advertising.  The primary objectives are to introduce issues of gender in the production of visual culture and how those visual ideas about gender demonstrate and question the accepted ideologies of our culture.  The intersections between gender, race, class and consumerism will be explored.  A comparison with earlier time periods will be made to emphasize the ways that ways that our ideas about gender have both evolved and remained the same.  The construction of gender ideologies from male and female perspectives will be stressed.  this is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG142 with a "C" or better Offered Spring even numbered years  443 Comparative Mythology (w) (3 hours) This course is a study of the great epics and myths of the world, emphasizing at least three classical western texts which may include Homer's Illiad and/or Odyssey, Hesiod's Theogony, virgil's Aeneid, Ovid's Metamorphoses, the prose and/or Poetic Eddas, and/or Dante's Inferno or Divine Comedy.  Students will analyza common themes in myth and folklore around the world and their role in ifluencing the contemporary world.  The course might discuss creation myths, fertility myths, and hero/heroine myths and epics.  This is a writing intensive course.  Meets literature requirement for graduation. Prerequisites: ENG 142 ("C" or better) and 200 level ENG or CUL or PHI Offered Fall odd numbered years Prerequisites: ENG142  Offered Fall odd numbered years 448 Women and Literature (w) (L) (3 hours) A literary study of the perceptions of women and their roles in society. This course may focus on the images of women as they are portrayed in literature, on particular female authors, or on both. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG142 ("C" or better) and 200 level ENG, CUL, or PHI     Offered Spring even numbered years 449 Minority Experience in American Literature (w) (3 hours) An examination of life in immigrant and minority cultures with emphasis on the breadth and diversity of literary culture in 20th Century America, but may include earlier literature. It may include historical development of the minority culture’s experiences in America. It may be run as a survey of a particular minority experience, or it my concentrate on certain major works. Students may read and report on readings from a secondary list as well. This is a writing intensive course.  Meets literature requirements for graduation. Prerequisites: ENG142 ("C" or better) and 200 level ENG, CUL, or PHI     Offered Spring odd numbered years back to the top Education (EDU) Lourdes University Professional Education (EDU) 100 Foundations of Education (3 hours) Offers historical, philosophical, political and social overviews of education. Students will examine how schools are organized, administered and financed. In addition, students will explore and experience the skills and competencies (ten performance standards) necessary to be an effective teacher. Legal issues such as the Professional Code of Ethics, legal rights of teachers and their legal responsibilities will be addressed. Required Field Base Experience. 150 Introduction to Technology in Education (3 hours) Provides practical skills in various ways to incorporate technology into the student’s personal educational program as well as integrating instructional technology into the classroom. 218 The Role of Phonics in Emergent Literacy (3 hours) Integrates cognitive and language development in children and across cultures, the linguistic aspects of language (content), and pedagogy or the teaching of phonics (theory and research) and its role in emergent literacy (reading). The focus is on the physiological, developmental, and sociological aspects of cognition and receptive and expressive language. The course uses the Ohio Academic Content Standards as the basis for curriculum development of literacy approaches and content in early childhood and middle school classrooms. 230 Survey of Special Needs Education (3 hours) Focuses on the foundations of special education with emphasis on historical background, legal issues, a positive learning environment, disabilities and health disorders in a regular/inclusive classroom, as well as developing teaching skills for use in an inclusive classroom.  Must pass with a "C" or better (C- is not acceptable.) Prerequisites: EDU100, EDU250, permission of education advisor. 250 Educational Psychology (3 hours) Addresses the foundation of Educational Psychology. Four major areas will be explored: general overview of psychology, life span development, human learning, and behavioral issues and problems. Prerequisites: EDU 100 312 Teaching Reading Through Literature for Young Adolescents (3hours) Focuses on the acquisition and development of reading skills, and the nature, implementation and process of reading instruction through literature. Students study the psychological and linguistic foundations of reading instruction with emphasis on the value of reading aloud to learners and strategies and skills needed to encourage and motivate students to pursue and respond to reading and writing. The course presents a practical study of fiction and nonfiction literature for young adolescents, including a study of literary elements, reading strategies, the implementation of flexible literacy programs, critical evaluation of texts and their use in the classroom. It also examines ways that various factors, such as content, purpose, tasks, settings, and cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity influence the reading process. Prerequisites: Permission of EDM advisor, ENG200 and EDU218. 316 Multicultural and Social Issues in Education (3 hours) Gives an overview of the interaction of school and society. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the social issues affecting education and the appropriate role and response of school and teacher. Prerequisites: EDA235 & Permission 319 Classroom Management for Middle Childhood and Adolescent to Young Adult Education (3 hours) This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to create an effective learning environment for a Gr. 4-12 classroom and to deal appropriately and effectively with behavioral issues within the classroom setting.  The course covers both legal and ethical implications and provides practical management techniques. Prerequisites: EDA250 or EDA250 329 Differentiate Instruction & Assessment (3 hours) This course provides specific pedagogy in the differentiation of instruction through various models suh as Response to Intervention (RIT), Multiple Intelligence Theory, Integrationof Fine Arts and specific technology adaptations.  Students will also develop specific assessment tools and strategies to use classroom settings. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: EDM350, EDA351 or EDA353 330 Developmental Reading Through Content Area Reading (3 hours) Focuses on reading as a tool for constructing meaning from text by accessing prior knowledge, applying schema, developing a purpose for reading, and emphasizing the value of reading aloud to learners. A basic understanding of the reading process combined with the application of reading strategies to build knowledge of study strategies will be examined. Explores questioning techniques, and cognitive processing in the comprehension of narrative and expository text to enhance the quality of life. 332 Reading Diagnosis and Assessment (3 hours) Focuses on reading as a tool for constructing meaning from text by accessing prior knowledge, applying schema, developing a purpose for reading, and emphasizing the value of reading aloud to learners. A basic understanding of the reading process combined with the application of reading strategies to build knowledge of study strategies will be examined. Explores questioning techniques, and cognitive processing in the comprehension of narrative and expository text, application of readability factors to the content textbook, study/learning strategies for the teacher and the student, and techniques for developing higher level thinking skills. Prerequisites: through Gate 1 and accepted into the Department of Education, permission of education advisor, EDE250, EDM250, EDA250. SCI370 Integrated Science for Teachers (3 hours) An interdisciplinary science course for education majors designed to provide content knowledge in areas outlined in the National Science Standards and Science for All Americans.  The course will demonstrate, through praxis, themes/project based approaches to teaching and learning science.  the course will focus on science as an inquiry process.  The course will involve students in lecture, relevant classroom projects, participation in hands-on-science labs, resource portfolio development and creation of a teachable science unit. back to the top English (ENG) Courses designated witha (w) are writing intensive and those with a (L) may be used to meet the General Education Literature requirement. 100 Introduction to College Reading and Writing (3 hours) See Foundations Courses at the beginning of the course description section for more information. 140 Introduction to Writing  (3 hours) This course emphasizes the structure, development, and writing of sentences and paragraph and introduces college-level essay techniques.  In addition, this course includes a thorough review of the basic and advanced rules of grammar, sentence structure, and diction.  Students must receive a grade of "c" or better in theis course to enroll in ENG141.  Students who have earned credit in ENG141 or ENG142 may not earn credit in ENG140.  This course counts toward open elective credit only. Prerequisite: ENG 100 with or better, or placement based on university assessment Offered Fall, Spring   141 Rhetoric and Introductory Research Writing  (3 hours) This course prepares students for academic writing and research.  Students will develop skills in summary, synthesis, and argument writing, and will be introduced to college research.  They may be taught these skills through a variety of rhetorical modes (pro/con, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, etc.) and /or through rhetorical analysis (ethos, logos, and pathos).  Emphasis is placed on developming essays characterized by stron thesis statements,; focused, coherent, and logically ordered paragraphs; correct grammar; and correct documentation in APA style.  Must receive a grade of “C” or better to enroll in ENG142. Prerequisite: ENG140 (“C” or better) or Placement     Offered Fall, Spring   142 Writing, Research and Literature (w) (3 hours) This course presents a range of literary genres that may include short story, drama, creative non-fiction, poetry, and/or the novel and helps students develop research skills. Through reading, discussion, and critical analysis, and research, students become familiar with literary genres as well as a range of critical approaches to literature. Students must receive a grade of "C" or better to receive credit toward graduationa nd to enroll in courses for which it is a prerequisite.  This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG141 with a  “C” or better       Offered Fall, Spring   190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (w) (3 hours) Students will complete in-depth research about a topic in literature, composition, or theory, with regular supervision and instruction by a faculty member.  Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.    221 History of the English Language  (3 hours) This course studies language and writing with a special emphasis on the history and evolution of English from its origins through Old English, Middle English, and Modern English. It may look at British, American English and World Englishes and how words are adapted to meet new needs. Students will study the English language as an ever-growing, ever-changing phenomenon.   Prerequisite: ENG142 with a "C" or better. Offered Spring  odd numbered years.   223 Advanced Grammar  (3 hours) This course is an in-depth study of modern English grammar that blends descripive and prescriptive approaches.  It emphasizes the distinction between grammatical form and function and the recognition of basic patterns underlying complex sentences, and it stresses the rhetorical value of competency in sentence-level grammar. Prerequisite: ENG141 with a "C" or better Offered Spring even numbered years    242 Short Story Interpretation (w)  (L) (3 hours) The course examines the short story as a literary genre. Students will read a wide range of stories from around the world and from different time frames. Emphasis is given to an understanding and critical appreciation of the structure and function of the short story. This is a writing intensive course.  Meets literature requirement for graduation. Prerequisite: ENG142 with a "C" or better.   Offered Fall even numbered years


251 Creative Writing Workshop I (w) (3 hours)
An introductory creative writing course that encourages and develops a student's freelance abilities in the communicative arts.  Students will write and criticize their own material and that of clasmates and professional writers in three genres (short story, poetry, essay).  Students will learn to tactfully critize, edit, and help fellow writers.   Completion of a portfolio of origginal work with a minimum of three short stories, six peoms, and one academic peice, or other equivalent combination of material will be required.  Creative Writing coursses can be taken out of sequence.

Prerequisite: ENG142 with a "C" or better. 

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 
252 Creative Writing Workshop II (w) (3 hours)
A continuation of advanced creative writing that encourages and develops further skills in writing creatively and expressing techniques of criticism. Students will experiment with different written forms and strategies, building upon past writing experience. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142.    

Offered Spring even numbered years

 
253 Creative Writing Workshop III (w) (3 hours)
A continuation of advanced creative writing that encourages and develops further skills in writing creatively and expressing techniques of criticism. Students will focus on either poetry or prose as their individual abilities progress. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142.    

Offered Fall even numbered years

 
254 Creative Writing Workshop IV (w) 3 hours)
A continuation of advanced creative writing that encourages and develops further skills in writing creatively and expressing techniques of criticism. Student writing will be with the goal of publication or application to graduate study in Creative Writing. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142.    

Offered Spring odd numbered years


262 Editing  (3 hours)
An advanced course in evaluating a written text for quality, value, tone, and voice for a variety of audiences. Attention will be given to proofreading, grammar, premise, logic, content, and holistic value of the finished piece.  
Offered Fall odd numbered years
 
291 British Literature I (Old English through the Restoration) (w) (3 hours)
This course is a survey of the major trends and themes in British literature from the eighth through the eighteenth centuries. By reading and responding critically to early works such as the Old English epic Beowulf, Middle English works by writers such as Chaucer and Langland, and continuing through the Renaissance (Shakespeare, Marlowe, More) to the Restoration and writings by Milton, Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson, students will gain an understanding of the various cultural, societal, political, religious, and linguistic influences that shaped British literature. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142    

Offered Fall even numbered years

 
292 British Literature II (Romanticism to WWII) (w) (3 hours)
This course is a study of the major trends and themes in British literature from Romanticism to the mid-twentieth century. By reading and responding critically to works from the Romantic through Modern periods, students will gain an understanding of British literature as well as the various cultural, societal, political, religious, and linguistic influences that shaped it. The course will include works by Romantic-era authors such as Blake, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, the Shelleys, and Keats; Victorian writers such as Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, and Arnold; and nineteenth and twentieth century works by such writers as Hardy, Yeats, Lawrence, Joyce, and Woolf. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142    

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 
293 American Literature I (Colonial to Civil War) (w) (3 hours)
This course is a study of the major trends and themes in British literature from Romanticism to the mid-twentieth century. By reading and responding critically to works from the Romantic through Modern periods, students will gain an understanding of British literature as well as the various cultural, societal, political, religious, and linguistic influences that shaped it. The course will include works by Romantic-era authors such as Blake, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, the Shelleys, and Keats; Victorian writers such as Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, and Arnold; and nineteenth and twentieth century works by such writers as Hardy, Yeats, Lawrence, Joyce,
and Woolf. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142 ("C" or better)   

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 
294 American Literature II (Civil War to WWII) (w) (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to major works and trends of American literature from 1865 to 1945. Students will read works by authors such as Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Jack London, Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, Henry James, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway with a focus on the development and impact of American literary realism, naturalism, and modernism. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG142 ("C" or better)   
Offered Spring even numbered years
 
313 Theoretical Approaches to Reading and Writing (3 hours)
Provides students with a foundation in composition and reading theory for teaching. Students study and practice writing and reading for a variety of purposes and audiences and analyze their experiences. The purpose of this course is to give students a theoretical foundation from which to shape and apply a philosophy of teaching reading and writing.

Prerequisite: ENG142    

Offered Spring odd numbered years


322 World Literature (3 hours)
This course is an examination of World Literature from the nineteenth century to the present.  It will examine the innovations in literary technique and genre in world literature, possibly including an introduction to postcolonial literature and theory.  Social, political, and technological changes and their ramifications on literature will be examined, as well as how literature changed the world in these turbulent times.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite:
ENG 142 (“C” or better)    
Offered Fall even numbered years
 
347 American Novel (w)  (3 hours)
A study of major trends and themes in the American novel. Literature describes a nation, likewise the nation influences the literature it produces. We examine what in American culture and history has influenced the novel and made it one of our most prized art forms. Major authors will be examined from the point of view of their unique contribution to the novel as art and commentary. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG142  ("C" or better)    
Offered Spring

348 The British Novel (w) (3 hours)
This course is a study of the major trends, themes, and developments in the British novel from the eighteenth century to the present.  Novels by major British authors are examined in terms of their unique contributions to the art and commentary of the novel as well as their influences on English culture, society, and literature.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite:  ENG 142 (“C” or better)    

Offered Fall

350 History of Dramatic Literature (w) (3 hours)
A survey course in dramatic literature designed to help develop an aesthetic awareness of dramaturgy as not only an art form, but also a study of human nature in all its proportions. The fundamental principles of theatre and the cultural significance of drama will be examined with special attention to playwrights, literary themes, social backdrops, character analyses, and interpretation of ideas conveyed in a presentational, rather than explanatory, format. Through a study of representative historical and contemporary plays, students will learn to become passionate readers of dramatic literature, participating minute-by-minute in the lives and problems of dramatic figures and arriving at an understanding of their motives and conduct. This is a writing intensive course

Prerequisite: ENG142 ("C" or better)    

Offered Spring

351 Greek Drama (w) (3 hours)

This course is a study of the major Greek dramatists, their works, their themes, and their culture.  Fifth century Athens experienced an explosion of political, cultural, and architectural development, and plays were preformed regularly in competition at the annual City Dionysia, a festival in honor of the god Dionysus.  Though the myths on which these plays are based were familiar to fifth century Athenians, the manner in which each playwright dramatized a particular myth was the product of his distinctive creative genius.  Students will become acquainted with the theatrical and intellectual contributions made by the three most successful and celebrated Greek playwrights - - Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides - - by addressing their plays as works of literature and by examining concomitant analyses provided by renowned crities.  Students will gain an understanding of the plays' major conflicts, the characters as both mythic heroes and personifications of human nature, and the dramatic spectacle that fifth century audiences enjoyed.  This is a writing intensive course.  Meets literature requirement for graduation.

Prerequisite: ENG142 with a "C" or better

Offered Spring odd numbered years

360 American Poetry (w)  (3 hours)

A survey of American poetry from the age of Whitman to the present, showing the effects of the Romantic Revolution on an American Puritan tradition, and the making of a national vernacular for poetry. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG142     
Offered Spring odd numbered years
 
361 English Poetry (w)  (3 hours)
A survey of English poetry from the Elizabethans through the Victorians. The course examines leading figures from the Elizabethans, the Seventeenth Century, the Eighteenth Century, the Romantics, and the Victorians. Trends and influences of each respective age are discussed in the progressive development of poetry in England.  This is a writing intensive course.  
Prerequisite: ENG142 ("C" or better)      
Offered Spring even numbered years
 
380 Shakespeare (w) (3 hours)
This is a course covering the life, works, and contributions of William Shakespeare. His plays are the standard by which all other drama is judged, so his influence on other works will also be part of the course. Presentation of Shakespeare’s plays as well as analysis of the plays and poetry will be parts of the course. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142 and ENG221 for majors     

Offered Fall even numbered years

381 Major Author in British & American Literature (w) (3 hours)

Students in this course engage in an in-depth of no more than two major authors in either British or American literature over the course of the semester.  These two authors will be drawn from the same or adjacent periods and will both be from the same country.  Offerings alternate between British and American authors every semester that the course is offered.  Authors studied in this course include major texts by authors ranging from Chaucer to Fielding, Mary Shelly, Tennyson, and Dickens in British literature to Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Twain, Dickinson and Whitman in American literature.  British and American Modernist era authors such as Cummings, Eliot, pound, Woolf, and Joyce will also be taught in some years.  This is a writing intensive course.  Meets literature requirement for graduation.

Prerequisite: ENG142 grade of "C" or better

Offered Fall

463 Literary Theory (w) (3 hours)
This course is a study of literary critical theory beginning with selected classical texts, such as Plato, Aristotle, Dryden, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and others. Approaches such as Marxist, psychological, structural, post-structural, feminist, reader-response, and as well as contemporary theorists, such as Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, Jean Baudrillard, Michel Foucault, and Jean-Francois Lyotard will also be discussed and analyzed. Through examination of sample texts and the theoretical approaches to their analysis, students will learn to move from literal to figurative interpretations of a work of literature and to consider multiple interpretations of a text. The interrelation-ships between writer, reader, and analysis will be explored though advanced literary critical theory. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG142 and 200 level ENG, CUL, or PHI    

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 
499 Senior Seminar  (3 hours)
The capstone course for English majors. With guidance and regular meetings with a faculty member, this course is self-determined and self-directed project that shows depth of knowledge and critical and original thought. Grading will be performed by a committee of English faculty.

Prerequisite: ENG142, 200 level ENG, CUL, or PHI, and Senior Standing    

Offered Spring


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English Language and American Culture (ELAC)

101 Reading Comprehension for 2nd Language Learners I (3 hours)                                   
Designed for foreign students with low to intermediate skills in reading English texts, this course provides the second language student with the basic skills necessary for reading texts in English and understanding them. Understanding a foreign language is more than simply knowing the correct translation of its words. Students learn how to read, evaluate, and comprehend texts written in English. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis; students must achieve at least a 70% score on total course assignments to receive a ‘P’.
Prerequisite: Placement is based on performance on the university assessment instruments.   Offered Fall, Spring
 
102 Reading Comprehension for 2nd Language Learners II  (3 hours)           
Designed for high-intermediate to advanced students, this course focuses on developing skills and proficiency in reading authentic materials on various topics. Emphasis is placed on using reading strategies to increase speed and comprehension, reading for different purposes, and developing vocabulary in authentic contexts. The topics will include politics, history, popular culture and general fiction. Many of the articles that the students will read and review will be current events. Reading for pleasure is encouraged. A student must receive a grade of “C” or better to enroll in non-ELAC courses.

Prerequisite: ENG101 or performance on the university assessment instruments.    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
103 Conversational English I (3 hours)                                    
This course is designed for low to intermediate level students who have demonstrated control of basic English grammatical structures and who need practice in oral expression of idea and thought. The course aims to increase fluency in spoken English and to expand vocabulary. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis; students must achieve at least a 70% score on total course assignments to receive a ‘P’.

Prerequisite: Placement is based on performance on the university assessment    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
104 Conversational English II  (3 hours)                                    
This course is designed for high-intermediate to advanced students who have general fluency in spoken English. The course aims to develop oral expression as well as to expand vocabulary necessary for academic study in American higher education programs. Students will be required to read, synthesize and discuss passages from various educational resources selected by the instructor and discuss their own ideas, opinions and life experiences. A student must receive a grade of C or better to enroll in non-ELAC courses.

Prerequisite: ENG103 or performance on the university assessment instruments.    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
105 Grammar & Writing in English (3 hours)                                    
This course is designed to further develop ESL students’ understanding of English grammar as a tool in writing effective sentences and paragraphs. The course seeks to develop writing abilities at all levels of the writing process, including generating ideas, planning and organizing content, drafting, proofreading, and revising. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis; students must achieve at least a 70% score on total course assignments to receive a ‘P’.

Prerequisite: Placement is based on performance on the university assessment   

Offered Fall, Spring

 
106 Academic Writing  (3 hours)                                    
This is a course in written communication in an academic environment. Emphasis is placed on development, structure, and writing of, summaries, reactions and critiques in paragraph and essay formats. The elements of academic research and writing are introduced. A student must receive a grade of C or better to enroll in non-ELAC courses.

Prerequisite: ENG105 or performance on the university assessment instruments.    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
109 Academic Reading Skills (3 hours)                                 
This course is designed to expand the student’s ability to learn at the college level through effective and efficient reading strategies. Combining class lecture, collaborative groups, and individualized instruction, students will participate in a variety of activities focused on learning from textbooks. These activities will develop individualized approaches to before, during, and after reading strategies. A student must receive a grade of “C” or better to enroll in non-ELAC courses.

Prerequisite: ENG102 or performance on the university assessment instruments.   

Offered Spring ’10 and Fall, Spring thereafter

110 Found of English Grammar (3 hours)
In this comprehensive English grammar course, topics include a verb tense review, the use of active and passive voice, structures used to compose compound and complex sentences, and the use of verbals (e.g., gerunds).  A variety of activities, exercises, and evaluative measures will help students to develop their grammar skills.  This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.  Lab free $25.

Prerequisite: Placement is based on performance on the university assessment

Offered Fall, Spring

ENG140 Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ESL emphasis) (3 hours)

An introductory writing course, English 140 concentrates on the development, structure, basic and advanced rules of grammar, sentence structure, and diction.  this section offers special emphasis on the needs of ESL students.  Students must receive a grade of C or better in this course to enroll in ENG141.  This course can be used for open elective credit only.  Lab fee $25.

Offered Fall, Spring

ENG141 Rhetoric and Introduction to Research Writing (ESL emphasis) (3 hours)

This is a course in written communication, culminating in a research paper.  Emphasis is placed on development, structure, and writing summaries and paraphrases.  Literary devices such as cause/effect, comparison/Contrast, Persuasion/argumentation are practiced, and research/synthesis skills are developed.  this section offers special emphasis on the needs of ESL students.  A student must receive a grade of C or better to enroll in ENG142.  Lab fee $25.

Prerequisite: ENG140 or placement

Offered Fall, Spring

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 Foreign Languages (Arabic and Spanish) 

ASL101 American Sign Language I (3 hours)

An introduction to the fundamentals of American Sign Language using a Functional-Notational approach.  Primary attention is given to receptive skills and using the language in context.  Areas of grammar covered include: spatial referencing, W"H questions, yes/no questions, non-manual markers, classifiers, possessive pronouns, negative responses, sentence types, role shifting, and topic/comment structure.

Offered Fall

ASL102 American Sign Language II (3 hours)

This continuation of ASL I with eight units covering topics such as personal and possessive pronouns, numerical incorporations, one-character role, contrastive structure, cultural language uses, time signs associated with frequency, above/below perspective, signer's and receptor's perspective,and temporal sequencing.  This course stresses the use of the language in context as well as through reviewing and repetition and is designed to help students acquire a certain level of skill in using some of the major grammatical features of ASL.

Prerequisite: ASL101 or placement

Offered Spring

ARB101 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic I  (3 hours)
This course is the first of a two-term sequence in elementary Arabic. It begins with an introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic. During this initial phase the student is also introduced to common greetings, expressions, and simple phrases. This is followed by combined listening, speaking, reading, and writing exercises supported by simple texts, audio recordings, and interactive communicative drills involving instructor-student, student-student, and group interactions. These tasks complement the introduction of elementary grammatical features. Cultural skills, required for effective communication, are developed through short texts and dialogues.
Offered Fall
 
ARB102 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II (3 hours)
This course builds upon those skills developed in ARB101-1. Having learned sound and script and basic grammatical features, this course continues to develop the students’ vocabulary and understanding of fundamental grammatical structures through situational exercises. Learning is supported by texts, audio recordings, and interactive communicative exchanges with other students and the instructor. As the students’ comprehension develops the language of instruction and interaction in the classroom incrementally shifts to Arabic. Basic texts and audio recordings further enhance cultural understanding and awareness in communication.

Prerequisite: ARB101    

Offered Spring

 
ARB201 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I  (3 hours)
This course continues the process of acquiring proficiency in the language. It presents more complex structures of Arabic to enable students to analyze and comprehend authentic texts and audio recordings. Listening, speaking, and writing skills are developed through texts, audio, and practice focused on previous and newly introduced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students are assigned extra reading and listening assignments to be completed with the aid of the dictionary. Whenever feasible, Arabic is the language of instruction and interaction in the classroom. Students are required to integrate cultural understanding and expression into communicative exchanges.

Prerequisite: ARB102    

Offered Fall

 
ARB202 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II  (3 hours)
Students will continue training in order to develop speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of exercises and activities based on the previous three terms, new vocabulary, and the introduction of further grammatical structures. These tasks are supported by authentic texts and audio recordings covering a wide range of topics to include history, culture, and contemporary events. Students are assigned extra reading and listening assignments to be completed with the aid of the dictionary. Students are required to integrate socio-cultural understanding and expression into communicative exchanges.

Prerequisite: ARB201    

Offered Spring

MANDARIN CHINESE (CHI)

CHI101 Mandarin Chinese 1 (3 hours)

The purpose of this course is to enable students to begin to acquire proficiency in Mandarin Chinese through a linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach to language learning.  Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and on the acquisition of the fundamentals of applied Chinese grammar.  Students will also begin the acquisition of the fundamentals of Pinyin, the Phonological System of Chinese sounds and the basic grammar.  Cross-cultural understanding is focused and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course.

Offered fall

CHI102 Mandarin Chinese 2 (3 hours)

Chinese 102 builds on Chinese 101 to help students continue to consolidate their Pinyin knowledge and to learn more vocabulary words and phrases. They will also learn more sentence patterns, grammar, and develop better listening and speaking skills. Students will improve both of their oral communication and reading comprehension skills.  Students will continue to explore Chinese culture, customs and history along the way.

Prerequisite: CHI101 or permission

Offered Spring

SPA101 Elementary Spanish I (3 hours)
The course will set the foundation for further language study. All elements of second language acquisition will be addressed. Due to the nature of the course and subject, all students are required to participate orally. Geography and cultural elements will also be covered.
Offered Fall even numbered years
 
SPA102 Elementary Spanish II  (3 hours)
The course will enhance the student’s ability to communicate in the foreign language in the three types of oral communication - interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive. Further emphasis will be placed on cultural items and global awareness. Grammatical elements required to complete the listed tasks will be presented as needed. There will be no English spoken in this course.

Prerequisite: SPA101 or placement    

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 
*Tiffin University has contracted with several colleges and universities in the area to
provide students with language courses on their campuses. Students may take
French, German, Japanese, Chinese and Russian. Contact Tiffin University’s Registrar’s
Office for more information.

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History (HIS)

111 American Society to 1865  (w) (3 hours)
This survey course focuses on the social, political, religious, economic and cultural experiences of the inhabitants of North America (excluding Canada) from colonization through revolution, to westward expansion and finally the American Civil War. Students learn the historical process, tracing themes through time and noting important connections among them. Students work with primary and secondary source materials to develop both content knowledge and process skills. History readily lends itself to an interdisciplinary approach; therefore, students should receive a variety of world-views experienced through a number of disciplines. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141 or concurrent    

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 
112 American Society since 1865 (w) (3 hours)
This course surveys American History from Reconstruction, through late nineteenth century industrialization, into the development of the nation as a world power by the mid-twentieth century, and culminating in her role during the Cold War and beyond. Students learn the historical process, tracing themes through time and noting important connections among them. Students work with primary and secondary sources to complete at least one written project designed to develop critical thinking skills and reinforce the historical process. History readily lends itself to an interdisciplinary approach; therefore, students should receive a variety of world-views experienced through a number of disciplines. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141 or concurrent    

Offered Spring even numbered years

 
137 Civilizations of the World (w) (3 hours)
Students will study the history of the major world civilizations. For each, they will learn about the origins, their contributions, and reasons for their collapse. A key component of the course will be to discover areas of similarity or overlap among the various civilizations studied. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141 or concurrent    

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics  (w) (3 hours)
Topics will vary. 
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.    
  
211 Western Society to 1500 (w) (3 hours)
This survey course focuses on the social, political, religious, economic, and cultural experiences of the inhabitants of the ancient Middle East, through Classical Greece and Rome, to the beginnings of the European nation-state. Students learn the historical process, tracing themes through time and noting important connections among them. In addition, they will work with primary and secondary sources to complete at least one written project designed to develop critical thinking skills and reinforce the historical process. History readily lends itself to an interdisciplinary approach; therefore, students should receive a variety of world-views experienced through a number of disciplines. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141 or concurrent   

Offered Fall even numbered years

 
212 Western Society since 1500 (w) (3 hours)
This survey course focuses on the social, political, religious, economic, and cultural experiences of Europeans from approximately 1500 to contemporary times. Students learn the historical process, tracing themes through time and noting important connections among them. In addition, they will work with primary and secondary sources to complete at least one written project designed to develop critical thinking skills and reinforce the historical process. History readily lends itself to an interdisciplinary approach; therefore, students should receive a variety of world-views experienced through a number of disciplines. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141 or concurrent    

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 
225 United States Diplomatic History Since 1895  (w) (3 hours)
Students will learn the concepts, institutions and personalities that have driven the rise of America as a world power since 1895.  Particular attention is placed on the post-World War II period, when the United States took a leading role in world affairs. Students will also assess the benefits and pitfalls of America’s role in the world today. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: HIS112, ENG142    

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 
226 United States Military History Since 1895  (w) (3 hours)
This course seeks to explain the role of the military in the growth and expansion of the country’s history. It begins with the early reliance on colonial militias, through nineteenth century wars of consolidation and expansion, to the emergence of the nation as a formidable world power in the two world wars of the twentieth century. From that point, the course will investigate the emphasis on a professional army over militias and the role of these forces in events around the world since 1945. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: HIS112, ENG142    

Offered Spring even numbered years

  
312 History of the Middle East  (w) (3 hours)
A survey of the history of the Middle East from the time of Muhammad (500 AD) through the beginning of the 21st Century. Specific emphasis is placed on the 20th Century and the decisions made that have resulted in the current world situation. The countries covered include Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141    

Offered Fall odd numbered year

 
313 History of East Asia  (w) (3 hours)
A survey of the history of East Asia focusing on the histories of China and Japan, their relationships with the other countries of East Asia and their relationships with the world at large. The majority of the course will concentrate on the 20th Century and particular emphasis will be placed on the impact these countries had on the United States and the Vietnam War. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141    

Offered Fall as needed

320 Ohio History (w) (3 hours)
This course introduces students to the history of the state of Ohio. It begins with the prehistory of Native people, follows the struggles among Europeans for the area during the colonial period, and traces the development of the region after statehood in 1803. The course will address a wide range of topics including the key role of Ohio during the late 19th century industrialization of the country, its contributions to the Civil War and national politics, the state’s changing demographics, and its relation with other states in the Midwest. Student field trips and the use of primary source material will also be encouraged. This is a writing intensive course.    
Offered Spring even numbered years.

425 Historiography (w) (3 hours)
This capstone course investigates how the study of history has evolved, with a special emphasis placed on competing historical theories. Using samples of historical writing from representative historians over time, students will seek to understand the role of objectivity and the temptations of manipulating the past to influence the future. In addition, they will learn how technology has influenced the profession. Material studied will include European as well as American historical thought and practice. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: History major either enrolled in or completed all major courses   

Offered Fall odd numbered years.


Mathematics (MAT)

100 Foundations of College Mathematics  (3 hours)

An algebraic foundation course covering algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, graphing in the Cartesian plane, and solving algebraic applications. This course does not count for credit toward graduation. Must receive a grade of ‘C’ or better to enroll in MAT173. Individuals who have earned credit in College Mathematics or higher level mathematics may not earn credit in MAT100.

Offered Fall, Spring

173 College Mathematics  (3 hours)

An applied approach to traditional algebra topics including linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, and radical expressions. Emphasis will be placed on application problems. This course does not count for credit toward graduation. Must have a grade of ‘C’ or better to enroll in MAT174/MAT181.

Prerequisite: MAT100 (“C” or better) or placement

Offered Fall, Spring

 
174 Finite Mathematics  (3 hours)
This course applies mathematical techniques to solve real-world problems and involves the study of topics including linear models, systems of equations, financial math, logic, probability, and statistics.
Prerequisite: MAT173 with “C” or better, or placement     Offered Fall, Spring
 
181 College Algebra  (3 hours)
The course topics include functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices, sequences, and counting principles with probability.
Prerequisite: MAT173 with “C” or better, or placement    Offered Fall, Spring
 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics  (3 hours)
Topics will vary. These courses offer topics of special interest to students to further their interest and knowledge in the area of mathematics.
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.  
 
251 Applied Mathematics (3 hours)
An applied approach of fundamental arithmetic and algebraic concepts and basic problem-solving skills. Emphasis is placed upon a problem-solving approach that requires students to be active participants in the examination of numerical concepts. (Required for Middle Childhood Math Concentrations)

Prerequisite: MAT173    

Offered Fall even numbered years

 
271 Geometry for Middle School Teachers (3 hours)
Considers synthetic methods, foundations of Euclidean geometry with a brief treatment of non-Euclidean geometry, and groups of transformations associated with geometry.

Prerequisite: MAT174/181    

Offered Spring even numbered years

 
273 Applied Statistics I  (3 hours)
A study in descriptive and inferential statistical methods that aid decision-making. Includes the following topics: probability, prob­ability distributions, calculation of parameters from a universe, calculation of statistics from a sample, hypothesis testing, regres­sion, and correlation. A hand-held calculator with scientific functions is required.
Prerequisites: CIT105/111 and MAT174 or MAT181  
Offered Fall, Spring
 
275 Elementary Analysis (3 hours)
This course covers traditional pre-calculus topics, including topics from advanced algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry.
Offered Spring odd numbered years
 

281 Calculus I (3 hours)

A first semester introductory course to graphical, numerical, and symbolic approach to differential calculus. Topics covered include functions, rates of change, limits, continuity, differentiability, rules of differentiation, and anti-differentiation. A study in the applications of calculus to motion, optimization, and related concepts.

Prerequisites: MAT174/MAT181, MAT275, or permission of instructor

Offered Fall

326 Statistics for Criminal Justice Majors (3 hours)

This course provides the mathematical framework for our capstone research methods class. It will provide students with a basic understanding of how to use data for research purposes. It will focus on the various statistical methods and formulas for analyzing and interpreting data. Offered through Online and Off-Campus Programs only

Prerequisite: MAT174

370 Teaching Mathematics in Middle School (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to current research and issues related to teaching mathematics in middle school. Students in this course will learn how to engage middle school students in meaningful mathematics, how to work with middle school students who are not meeting minimum standards and how to prepare middle school students for high school courses in mathematics. They will become knowledgeable about the current State of Ohio Math Standards.
Offered Fall odd numbered years
 
373 Applied Statistics II  (3 hours)
This course further develops topics introduced in Applied Statistics I. Additional topics covered will include analysis of variance, multiple regression, time series analysis, quality control and decision theory. The course makes use of available computer software as a problem-solving tool. 
Prerequisite
: MAT273   
Offered Spring odd numbered years
 

381 Calculus II (3 hours)

A continuation of the concepts learned in Calculus I. This course includes a study of the techniques and applications of integral calculus. Topics include calculus of transcendental functions including logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions. Techniques of integrations, sequences, and various series are covered.

Prerequisites: MAT281, or permission of instructor

Offered as needed

DESCRIPTIONS

481 Calculus III (3 hours)

A continuation of the concepts learned in Calculus II. This course includes an introduction

to the calculus of vectors, vector-valued functions, and three dimensional surfaces.

Topics include a development of vector calculus, motion in space, functions of

two or more variables and their derivatives, multiple and partial integrals, and surface

integrals.

Prerequisites: MAT381, or permission of instructor

Offered as needed

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Music PROFESSIONAL (MUP)

MUP121 Musicianship I (3 hour)

This course covers the basics of music theory, including concepts of sound, music notation, rhythm, meter, intervals, modes, scales, and triads. Additionally, students will learn functional/foundational keyboard skills, and how to apply these basic theoretical concepts to a keyboard instrument.

Offered fall even numbered years.

MUP190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)

Topics will vary. May or may not be writing intensive.

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

MUP221 Musicianship II (3 hours)

This course presents an expanded understanding of basic music theory concepts through the use of harmonic analysis, composition, sight singing, ear training, and transcription. Students will also learn how these concepts apply to keyboard instruments playing scales, chords and harmonic progressions.

Prerequisite: MUP121

Offered spring odd numbered years.

MUP240 The Rhythm Section (3 hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to playing and performing in a pop, jazz or rock rhythm section. Students learn the rhythm section roles and functions of keyboard, guitar, bass and drums, and over the course of the semester are introduced to basic playing technique on three different instruments. The course focuses on playing together in small groups of three or four students, and is open to all students regardless of major or experience level.

Offered spring odd numbered years.

MUP321 Musicianship III (3 hours)

This course addresses harmonic and formal analysis, basic part-writing techniques, and gives students a survey of compositional techniques used in Classical, Jazz, and Pop/Contemporary music. Students will simultaneously learn to apply these techniques to keyboard instruments through use of chord/melody playing, stylistic tendencies and practices, and the realization of printed sheet music (lead sheets, chorales, etc.).

Prerequisite: MUS221

Offered fall odd numbered years.

MUP322 Musicianship IV (3 hours)

This course presents students with advanced theoretical concepts by way of composition, basic arranging and orchestration, analysis, transcription and the development of advanced aural skills. Keyboard skills studied include the playing of advanced scales, chord inversions, basic accompanying, printed music interpretation, improvisation and sight-reading. The course requires students to demonstrate a minimum level of functional keyboard proficiency.

Prerequisite: MUS321

Offered spring even numbered years.

MUP351 Music Listening & Analysis I (3 hours)

MUP352 Music Listening & Analysis II (3 hours)

This sequence is designed to give students an exposure to the evolution of music history, but with an approach that differs from traditional music history courses. Instead of presenting dozens of musical styles and hundreds of composers and performers, the courses explore a limited number of significant pieces at a greater depth, using these representative examples to develop students’ critical listening and analytical skills, aesthetic sensibilities, and historical and sociological awareness. This approach allows students to be better equipped to pursue their own study of music that most interests them and is most applicable to their own career aspirations.

Prerequisite: MUP221

MUP440 Teaching Music (3 hours)

This course is designed to give students the experience they will need to succeed as entrepreneurial musicians running their own private teaching studio and leading their own musical ensembles. The course focuses on basic classroom, studio and ensemble pedagogy, and on helping students develop skills that will help them succeed as teachers, bandleaders, managers and performers. This course was developed to address some of the most important skills not taught in other university music programs.

Prerequisite: MUP321

Offered fall even years

 


 

Music (MUS)

110/210/310 Instrumental Ensembles (1 hour)
Students in the University Bands explore a variety of musical styles, forms, and genres, and are taught technique, music literacy, forms and styles, in order to achieve both the individual’s musicianship growth and the development of the entire ensemble. Students will be subject to individual performance evaluations, and involvement in performances on campus, off campus, and on tour may be required.
Offered Spring
 
112/212/312 Choral Ensembles  (1 hour)
Students in the University Choral and Vocal Ensembles explore a variety of musical styles, forms, and genres, and are taught tech­nique, music literacy, forms and styles in order to achieve both the individual’s musicianship growth and the development of the entire ensemble. Students will be subject to individual performance evaluations, and involvement in performances on campus, off campus, and on tour may be required.
Offered Spring
 
115/215/315 Private Music Instruction: Instrumental  (1 hour)
This individual study is based on fundamentals of technique and basic musicianship on the student's primary instrument. Students meet with an instructor of their given instrument 50 minutes per week for private lessons in order to address individual issues related to these topics. Studies include technical exercises, etudes, and an appropriate sampling of literature. A final examination is conducted by jury. Private Music Instruction fee required.
Offered Fall, Spring
 
116/216/316 Private Music Instruction: Instrumental (1 hour)
This individual study is based on fundamentals of technique and basic musicianship on the student’s primary instrument. Students meet with an instructor of their given instrument 50 minutes per week for private lessons in order to address individual issues related to these topics. Studies include technical exercises, etudes, and an appropriate sampling of literature. A final examination is conducted by jury. Private Music Instruction fee required.
Prerequisite: MUS115  Offered Fall, Spring
 
117/217/317 Private Music Instruction: Vocal  (1 hour)
This individual study is based on fundamentals of vocal technique and basic musicianship. Students meet with an instructor of their voice part 50 minutes per week for private lessons in order to address individual issues related to these topics. Studies include technical exercises, etudes, and an appropriate sampling of literature. A final examination is conducted by jury. Private Music Instruction fee required.
Offered Fall, Spring
 
118/218/318 Private Musical Instruction: Vocal (1 hour)
This individual study is based on fundamentals of vocal technique and basic musicianship. Students meet with an instructor of their voice part 50 minutes per week for private lessons in order to address individual issues related to these topics. Studies include technical exercises, etudes, and an appropriate sampling of literature. A final examination is conducted by jury. Private Music Instruction fee required.

Prerequisite: MUS117 

Offered Fall, Spring

 
223 Music Appreciation (3 hours)
The course focuses on the aesthetics of music, listening skills necessary to fully appreciate music, and the societal and cultural roles that music plays. Various folk and art musical styles will be studied, with attention to their historical evolution and influence on one another.
Offered Fall
 
230 Introduction to Sound and Recording Technology (3 hours)
Students will explore the basic principles involved in the process of sound reinforcement and recording, including microphones and the principles of sound transduction, basic analog audio electronics, device interconnection, shielding and grounding, analog-to-digital conversion, magnetic recording processes in both analog and digital systems, and standard practices of recording, mixing, editing and mastering. Studio and live sound equipment are used in class, in studio exercises, and student projects.

Prerequisite: MAT173    

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 
321 Music Theory and Application  (3 hours)
This course will allow students to develop an understanding of intermediate music theory and ear training, and will also teach functional keyboard skills. The course will address harmonic and formal analysis, basic part-writing techniques, basic arranging and orchestration, and give students a survey of compositional techniques used in classical music and modern-day practices.
Prerequisite: MUS121    
Offered Spring odd numbered years
 
324 Survey of American Popular Music (w) (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide a general historical overview of the development of popular music in the United States. Students will learn to listen closely and critically to popular musical styles; appreciated the historical and social contexts of popular music; understand some of the people, institutions and conditions that have shaped popular music; and think creatively and critically about the cultural role of popular music. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 142

327 Music Business  (3 hours)
Focuses on the history, procedures, standard practices, economics and technologies involved with all facets of the business of music. Significant objectives include an understanding of important approaches to the recording industry, recognizing other areas of the music industry and understanding how the different areas interrelate. A careful examination of the economic considerations driving the music business will be discussed.
Offered Spring odd numbered years

330 Recording Studio Performance & Practice (3 hours)

This course is designed to explore intermediate and advanced principles regarding recording practices and the principles of sound transduction. This will include basic signal flow analyses, digital and analog sound synthesis, advanced microphone selection and placement techniques, MIDI mapping, audio sampling and sequencing using analog and digital interfaces, advanced audio editing using digital audio workstations,

basic mixing and mastering techniques and basic sound repair and maintenance. Studio and live sound equipment will be used in class, studio exercises, and student projects.

Prerequisite: MUS230

Offered spring even numbered years.

427 Music Business Seminar  (3 hours)
This course provides students with the opportunity to explore the current state and the future of the recording industry, music publishing industry, and music industry and intellectual property law. Students conceive and develop ideas and proposals for musical entrepreneurship, and create an individual project that draws together work from previous courses and their own musical and professional experience.
Prerequisites: MUS230, MUS324, MUS327   

Offered Spring


Natural Sciences (NAT)

114 Survey of Science (3 hours)
A general science course that entails a brief overview of the major science disciplines of biological science, earth science, physics, and chemistry. The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts and principles of biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics and demonstrate and understanding for the process of scientific discovery and their implications in our society.
Offered Spring/Fall
 
124 Introduction to Athletic Training (3 hours)
This course emphasizes the prevention, recognition, and treatment of athletic injuries. Taping, wrapping, and reconditioning of athletic injuries are also covered in this course. Additionally, First Aid and CPR are a part of the curriculum.
Offered Fall

150 Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology (3 hours)
This course will provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of each body system. The most common diseases and disorders are explored to understand the physician’s diagnosis and treatment. Correct spelling of corresponding terminology is emphasized.  Offered through the online Associate Degree Program only.

190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics  (3 hours)
Topics will vary. These topics will be of special interest to students to further their interest and knowledge in the area of natural science.
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses. 
 
201 Physical Science (3 hours)
An introductory study of physics, chemistry, astronomy, earth science, and weather. The following topics are explored: motion, energy, heat, wave motion, sound, light, atomic structure, elements, chemical change, the universe, the solar system, rocks and minerals, earthquakes, weathering and erosion, volcanoes, plates, the atmosphere, clouds, storms, tornadoes, and climate.
Offered Fall even numbered years
 
205 Earth Science (3 hours)
An introduction to the basic concepts of earth sciences.  Topics to be covered include the structure and composition of earth, physical and chemical processes shaped/shaping the earth, types and distribution of rocks and minerals, natural resources, and environmental and economic impacts of the earth. 
Offered Spring odd numbered years
 
210 Oceanography (3 hours)
An introductory course dealing with the basic physical and chemical aspects of oceanography.  Topics to be covered include the origin and evolution of oceans, physical, and chemical properties of ocean waters, physical and chemical processes operating in oceans, climate/weather patters, and the interaction between humans, oceans, and the atmosphere.    
 
215 Environmental Science (3 hours)
An introduction to the basic chemical, physical, and geological aspects of environmental sciences.  Topics to be covered include ecosystems, physical, chemical, and geological processes involved in shaping the environment, political, economic, and social impacts of the environment, pollution, and the major contemporary environmental issues with examples from Ohio and surrounding states.   
Offered Spring even numbered years
 
220 Survey of Health Issues (3 hours)
Health decisions made today are the building blocks for future personal health. This course will assist the student in making personal health decisions by introduction of resources and information pertaining to various health issues, health trends and examination of issues pertinent to the life of today’s college student.
Offered Fall odd numbered years

275  Introduction to General Chemistry (3 hours)
The General Chemistry course is a three credit hour lecture class with no laboratory required. The course is an introduction into the basic concepts of chemistry and will serve as the chemistry requirement for the general science major and for the training of the middle school teachers. 
Prerequisites:  MAT174/181, basic chemistry or biology recommended    Offered Spring

 291 Drugs and the Body (w)  (3 hours)
The focus of this course is to develop an effective perspective on the multifaceted aspects and problems associated with drug use, abuse, addiction, and treatment.
Offered Spring odd numbered years

300 Introduction to Green Technologies  (3 hours)
This foundation courses is an introduction to the science of clean or “green” technologies that are either currently utilized in the world or under development.  Special focus will be placed on solar, water, and wind power and their applications to conserve and protect the world’s natural resources.  Emphasis will be placed on the current trends for preserving and sustaining the world’s ecosystems both here in the United States and abroad.
Offered Fall

310 Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours)

This course will acquaint the student with the general structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the human body and its interrelated systems. Focus will be placed on the interdependence of body systems to maintain stability within the human body.
Offered Fall

320 Survey of Health (3 hours)

This course provides students with an understanding of personal wellness, to increase knowledge pertaining to common health problems, and to obtain an understanding of the promotion of personal health and prevention of illness. Students will learn strategies to maintain and/or improve well-being.

Offered through Online and Off-Campus Programs only

370 Pollution Prevention and Conservation (3 hours)
A study of pollution prevention techniques and practices both within the United states and around the world.  Emphasis will be placed on the history of water reclamation, soil remediation, and air stripping methods.  The course will also explore how governments, cities, and industries are conserving natural resources and what is being done with “green” or clean technologies to improve conservation efforts.

Prerequisite: NAT300    

Offered Spring

450 Renewable Energies and Sustaining Ecosystems (3 hours)
A comprehensive study of the earth’s renewable energy sources including a review of the various types of energies used in society both past and present.  The course will also focus on the ecosystems of the world especially the high profile ecosystems in the rainforest areas, Great Lakes, and the polar regions.  A special focus will be placed on the reliance of green or clean technologies to protect and preserve the ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: NAT300



PARALEGAL (PAR)

110 Introduction to Paralegal Profession (3 hours)

Course Description: Foundation course for the study of the paralegal’s role in the legal profession. Explores nature, responsibilities, and ethics of paralegal activities and relationship of paralegals to lawyers and the public. An overview of the legal system is covered. Technical skills used by a paralegal include current law office technologies: use of data management systems, spreadsheet software, litigation support software,

legal timekeeping/billing software, calendaring/docket software and case management software.

Offered Fall

190, 290, 390, 490  Special Topics (3 hours)

Topics will vary.

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

221 Tort Practicum (2 hours)

This course will introduce students to tort practice. A student will learn to apply the learned elements of intentional, negligent and strict liability classes of torts, and tort defenses to case documents and procedures. This course also instructs the student regarding the role of insurance contracts and settlements in tort cases.

Offered Fall

222 Civil Litigation and Procedure Practicum (3 hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to the legal concepts and the practical applications of civil litigation using a transactional approach to the Rules of Civil Procedure as used in the Federal and State Court systems. Topics covered include the role of the paralegal, and the court system, (including personal and subject matter jurisdiction), remedies, pleadings, motions and discovery. Introduction to the procedural concepts of civil litigation, with an emphasis on jurisdiction, venue, service of process, parties, pleading and discovery, trial processes, appellate review and the common law doctrine of res judicata.

Offered Fall

223 Contract/Sales Practicum (2 hours)

A study of the basic application of the principles of contract and sales law, which includes the process of contract formation, contract enforcement, and remedies for breach of contract. This course first focuses on the formation of a contract with emphasis on the review of the legal principles and statutes involved in specific types of contracts. Special consideration will be given to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). Students must draft for attorney review an applicable contracts and UCC documents.

Offered Spring

224 Business Organizations Practicum (2 hours)

This course presents basic concepts of business organizations with emphasis on the paralegal’s role in the application of the substantive law. A student will be able to define specified vocabulary. Application of legal principles will include agency contracts, sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and other emerging business entities.

Offered Spring

235 Legal Research (3 hours)

This course provides the student with an introduction to the basic concepts of legal research and writing by using computerized technology. Academic topics covered include the organization, sources, and publication of legal authorities, the formatting of court opinions and other court memoranda and briefs. Technical and academic topics include understanding, locating, and analyzing primary and secondary legal authorities as well as verifying the accuracy of sources for legal writing projects. Students will also learn to prioritize various sources of law and how they are used to provide a basis for legal writing. Students will learn to cite references correctly and will learn to identify the standard for legal citation. Students will analyze a problem in order to identify legal elements necessary for attorney review, and will apply legal analysis by interviewing a mock client, performing research on the client’s legal problem, and drafting a legal memorandum to an attorney concerning the matter.

Offered Fall

236 Legal Writing (3 hours)

After completing this course, the student is expected to have acquired the basic skills necessary for writing legal documents. This course will provide students with experience in legal writing. The course is designed to give the student exposure to writing basic legal correspondence, briefs, pleadings, (including motions, complaints, answers, appeals, etc.) The Student should acquire an understanding of the skills and duties of a paralegal in an active law office setting, The course will culminate in a legal research and writing project which will require the student to integrate knowledge gained from Legal Research and this course.

Prerequisite: PAR235

Offered Spring

341 Property Practicum (3 hours)

A study of the principles, application, and documents of law concerning the nature of property, including estates, licensing, marital and concurrent interests, and landlord/tenant relationships. Emphasis is placed on drafting documents and real estate closing document preparation.

Offered Fall

342 Estates/Trusts/Probate Practicum (4 hours)

This course is designed to provide a general framework of the substance and practice of wills, trusts, and estates. The course also serves to give the student practical information and skills to better enable him to assist in the delivery of estate planning and probate services to clients under the supervision of an attorney. Emphasis is placed on document drafting skills and probate procedures.

Offered Spring

343 Bankruptcy Law Practicum (2 hours)

This course of study is designed to provide a basic understanding of the practice of bankruptcy law. It will include an understanding of the law of bankruptcy in both the consumer and business areas and provide practical instruction as to application of bankruptcy law in every day practice. This course will include the changes in the bankruptcy law after enactment of the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA).

Offered Spring

344 Criminal Law/Procedure Practicum (2 hours)

The course outlines the purpose and function of criminal law. Topics include but are not limited to: evidence to the state of mind and the criminal act, the elements of criminal acts and the gathering of evidence of the criminal act, the classification of criminal acts, legal documentation regarding the rights and duties of citizens and police in relation to local, state, and federal law (i.e. arrest, search and seizure, confessions); constitutional issues; sentencing and other post-conviction social issues. Heavy emphasis is placed on the paralegal role in the criminal law practice.

Offered Spring

345 Family Law Practicum (4 hours)

Comprehensive study of the concepts of marriage, divorce, dissolution, child custody and support, and related topics. State law and the drafting of appropriate documents are emphasized. Aspects of family law studied include common law marriage, prenuptial agreements, annulments, civil unions, adoptions, paternity and neglect actions. The court emphasizes divorce law and reviews important aspects to consider in property division, alimony, custody and support in a divorce. The course also describes

post-divorce collection actions and necessary court actions after a divorce. Students will learn common terminology in family law and some of the procedural concerns to consider in these areas of law.

Offered Fall

400 Law Office Management (3 hours)

Overview of management and techniques as they apply to the law office. Common procedures for various types and sizes of law practices, accounting, fees and billing, records management, and state-of-the-art technology will be discussed. A student will learn preparation of forms, checklists, docket control, personnel problems, and self- management.

Offered Fall

470 Internship (3 hours)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Individualized Course Objectives will be identified for each student in a class meeting with the Director of the Paralegal program prior to the beginning of the supervised paralegal duties.

Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair


Philosophy (PHI)

110 The Art of Reasoning (3 hours)           
This course introduces students to philosophy through a study of the art of reasoning, which is essential in any field or endeavor that requires clear, skillful and critical thinking. Students will learn how to classify concepts, formulate definitions, analyze and evaluate propositions, analyze, construct and evaluate arguments, and identify common fallacies in reasoning. The study is oriented towards practical applications and involves a variety of skills in the analysis and evaluation of reasoning in daily life, scientific inquiries and professional fields.

Prerequisite: ENG 141 or Concurrent    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
112 Great Philosophers (3 hours)
This course introduces students to philosophy through a historical study of great philosophers and their representative works.  The course study may be a survey of the history of philosophy, or the history of philosophy in a particular culture (e.g., a history of Chinese philosophy), or the history of a particular area in philosophy (e.g., a history of epistemology), or a survey of a particular historical period (e.g., ancient Greek philosophy), or a study of a particular school (e.g., pragmatism) or a study of one philosopher’s work (e.g., Plato).  
Prerequisite: ENG 141 or Concurrent    
Offered Fall/Spring
 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics  (3 hours)
Topics will vary. 
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.  
 
210 Philosophical Problems (w)  (3 hours)
This course introduces students to philosophy through a survey of the core questions in some of the main areas in philosophy. These areas of philosophy may include philosophy of religion, metaphysics and epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics, philosophy of life, social and political philosophy, and so on. In the study of each area, students will be exposed to different schools of thought. The course may also be taught as a study of a particular school of thought in philosophy (e.g., rationalism), examining its theories in the above-mentioned areas of philosophy. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: ENG 141    

Offered Fall

 
212 Symbolic Logic (3 hours)
This course introduces students to philosophy through a study of reasoning in a symbolic system, including sentential (or propositional) and quantificational (or predicate) systems. Students will learn how to translate claims and arguments expressed in a natural language into a system of logical symbols, evaluate those claims and arguments in accordance with logic rules that are also formulated in that system of logical symbols, and enjoy the simplicity and precision of logical thinking.

Prerequisite: ENG 141   

Offered Spring

 
215 Ethics (3 hours)
This course is a critical examination of various moral problems from the perspectives of different ethical theories. The emphasis is given to those moral problems that arise in daily life, especially those that involve rational decision between conflicting values, each of which represents something good in itself in order to do what is right.

Prerequisite: ENG 141 or concurrent    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
305 Applied Ethics  (3 hours)
This course introduces students to ethics through a critical examination of various moral problems present in contemporary society and involved in various professions from the perspectives of different ethical theories. The practical moral problems to be dis­cussed include distribution of wealth and income, near and distant peoples, conflicts of interest, pollution and environmental haz­ards, invasion of privacy, private property and public interest, abortion and euthanasia, sex equality, affirmative action, sexual harassment, pornography, hate speech, gay and lesbian rights, gun control, animal liberation and environmental justice, punish­ment and responsibility, war and humanitarian intervention.
Prerequisite: ENG142, 3 hrs of PHI

306 Business Ethics (3 hours)

Several major ethical theories are reviewed. Adult learners are asked to examine personal values through readings and workplace analyses to formulate a management philosophy incorporating business ethics, government accountability, human rights, and a responsible lifestyle in the contemporary world. Offered through Online and Off-Campus Programs only

Prerequisite: Six hours of writing or composition

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 THEATRE (THR)

190, 290, 390, 490  Special Topics (3 hours)

Topics will vary.

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

 222 Introduction to Theatre (3 hours)
A survey course in theatre and drama designed to help develop an aesthetic awareness of all forms of performance combined with an appreciation of theatre in history. The fundamental principles of theatre and the cultural significance of drama will be examined with special attention to the role of playwright, actor/performer, designer, and critic. Through a study of representative historical and contemporary plays, students will hone skills of thoughtful inquiry important to the pursuit of any profession. 
Prerequisite: ENG141, students must be available for play productions.    

Offered Spring

250 The Art of Acting  (3 hours)
This course is the study and practice of the art of acting through identification with one’s own personality and vision of oneself in the development of a character.  Students will learn to appreciate themselves as human beings, with experiences, emotions, and intellect that must be employed in the development of a role, and to replace masks, clichés, and stereotypes with human behavior, instinct, and action in the characters they portray.  Students will gain an appreciation for discipline, practice, and concentration as necessary components of theatrical success.  Through lecture and object exercises, students will practice their craft and learn new ways to “wear the pants” of a specific role.  They will learn to conduct research as an initial preparation step, as they study and explore a specific role to be portrayed in a final class presentation. 
Prerequisite:  THR 222    

Offered Spring odd

261 Elements of Theatre (3 hours)
This course is designed to offer students an amalgamation of the various elements that make up theatre, including play production, dramatic literature, and the artisans of theatre.  Students will gain hands-on experience in play production by joining a specific crew for TU’s semester theatre production, and they will read and discuss a sampling of dramatic works by modern playwrights, including O’Neill, Synge, Shepard, and Miller.  By looking at theatre as both literature and performance, students will learn to appreciate the social and psychological elements of modern dramatic works, as well as the creative measures used in turning a dramatic work into a production.
Prerequisite: ENG141, students must be available for play productions   

Offered Fall

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Accounting (ACC)

190, 290, 390, 490 Speical Topics (3 hours)

Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

 
201 Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
An introduction to the fundamentals of accounting from the user’s perspective. The primary emphasis is the relationship between cash flow and accrual based income measurement. Includes financial reporting requirements and standards.

Prerequisite: MAT173

Offered Fall, Spring

 
210 Analysis of the Accounting Process (3 hours)
This course is designed to develop the student’s ability to analyze and record accounting transactions, prepare financial statements, and analyze accounting information for decision making.  
Prerequisite: ACC201 
Offered  Fall and Spring
 
228 Managerial Accounting (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide information to the management student who will be charged with directing and controlling operations from within the organization. Emphasis is placed on corporation reports, statements, schedules, and summaries pre­pared for the use of management.  
Prerequisite: ACC201  
Offered Fall, Spring
  

231 Computerized Accounting (3 hours)

A comprehensive study of the entire accounting cycle using computerized accounting software (currently Quickbooks). 

Prerequisite: CIS111, ACC210, ACC228

Offered through online and off-campus programs only.

 
301 Intermediate Accounting I (3 hours)
Intermediate Accounting is a study of financial accounting theory in relation to reporting practices. Emphasis is on generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by official accounting boards (i.e. FASB). Intermediate Accounting I includes the role of accounting as an information system and economic resources.
Prerequisite: ACC210  
Offered Fall
 
302 Intermediate Accounting II (3 hours)
Intermediate Accounting is a study of financial accounting theory in relation to reporting practices. Emphasis is on generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by official accounting boards (i.e. FASB). Intermediate Accounting II includes finan­cial instruments and additional topics.  
Prerequisite: ACC301 (“C” or better)  
Offered Spring
 
304 Federal Income Tax (3 hours)
Determination of taxable and nontaxable income, deductions, and tax liability for individuals and corporations. Includes background and objectives of the federal tax system.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ACC210  
Offered Spring
 

305 Accounting for Decision-Making (3 hours)

This course will build on the fundamentals covered in earlier, introductory accounting courses.  Students will develop relevant accounting related skills and integrate accounting knowledge with broader management issues.  External, financial accounting topics will be explored by moving through the sequence of balance sheet accounts and the related revenue and expense accounts.  Cost accounting issues will be addressed.  This course will explore the relationship of these two accounting environments and integrate the two fields.

Prerequisite: ACC201

Offered through online and off-campus programs only.

 
313 Cost Accounting I (3 hours)
A comprehensive study of the cost accounting cycle. Includes job order costing techniques and procedures. 
Prerequisite
: ACC228  
Offered Fall
 
314 Cost Accounting II (3 hours)
Continuation of Accounting 313. Emphasis is on process and standard costing techniques. Includes cost control and management decision concepts.

Prerequisite: ACC313 (“C” or better)  

Offered Spring

390 Special Topics: Corporate Taxation (3 hours)
Prerequisite: ACC210
  
402 Governmental & Not-for-Profit Accounting (3 hours)
Examines accounting for state and local governmental entities and accounting for Not-for-profit organizations. 
Prerequisite
: ACC210  
Offered Spring even numbered years
 
403 Accounting Information Systems (3 hours)
This course lays a foundation for understanding accounting user support, information technology, and business problem solving. The emphasis of this course is the interrelationship between different facets of an accounting information system. A detailed study of both a manual system and a computerized system is included.

Prerequisites: ACC210, CIT105/111, Junior Standing  

Offered Fall

404 Auditing (3 hours)
Presents a basic overall framework of auditing and assurance services including both conceptual and procedural matters. Discusses ethical concepts of the accounting profession. 
Prerequisite: ACC403  
Offered Spring
 
405 Fraud Examination in Accounting (3 hours)
Covered in this course are the nature of fraud, and general concepts about fraud detection and prevention. Investigative methods cover several elements of fraud: the theft act, the concealment of fraud, and the conversion of assets taken. Various types of fraud studied include financial statement (management) fraud, fraud against the organization, and consumer fraud.

Prerequisite: ACC403 or concurrent 

Offered Fall

470 Internship (3 hours)
Provides the student with on-the-job experience in varied aspects of accounting. Hours and work assignments will be arranged on an individual basis.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of the School Dean or Designee

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Business Law (LAW)

115 Survey of Healthcare Law in United States (3 hours)

This course examines the current healthcare law relevant to the current healthcare environment.  Students will learn about legal terminology and legal procedures. They will learn about patient confidentially – privacy and how these laws effect the healthcare providers, healthcare organizations, and patients.
Offered through online Associate Degree Program only

LAW190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)

Investigation of selected areas or contemporary problems. May or may not be writing intensive.

Prerequisite: Listed in schedule of courses found in Self Service

211 Business Law I (3 hours)
An examination of civil and criminal law and process and their interrelationship. The course also examines application of the con­stitution to business with particular emphasis on the court system and administrative agencies. Substantively, the content areas of torts and contracts will be examined.  
Prerequisite: ENG141
Offered Fall
 
212 Business Law II (3 hours)
Building on a basic understanding of contract law, the student will be introduced to the Uniform Commercial Code in the areas of sale of goods, commercial paper, and secured transactions. In addition, the law of agency and topics on partnership and corpora­tions will be considered. 
Prerequisite: LAW211  
Offered Spring
 
260 Legal Issues in Sports and Recreation (3 hours)

Title IX, risk management, tort, liability, agency, contract, antitrust, constitutional, labor law and intellectual property law are examined as applicable for managers in the sport and entertainment industry. Actual court cases concerning legal issues are presented relating to sport events, special events, athletics, the hotel industry, tourist attractions, amusement parks and recreational settings.

Prerequisite: LAW211

Offered Spring

 
301 Legal Regulation of Business (3 hours)
This course will examine the broader legal aspects of governmental regulation of business in relation to public policy, social issues, and business ethics. Criminal laws affecting business legal intricacies of purchase, sale and transfers, survey of federal, state, local and international statutes affecting business such as bankruptcy laws, consumer protection laws, securities regulations and international trade laws will be studied.

Prerequisite: LAW211  

Offered as needed

 302 Business Law for Managers (3 hours)

This course studies the history, background, sources and influences of our modern day law as it pertains to the business activities of individuals, corporations and other legal entities, with particular emphasis upon business litigation, legal liabilities, and the laws governing contracts, creditors’ rights, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, partnerships, and corporations. Offered through online and off-campus programs only.

303 Health Care Law (3 hours)

This course examines the ever changing legal trends faced in the healthcare environment. This course will provide the student with the skills necessary to mitigate liability through risk management principles, develop relationship management skills, incorporate employment law procedures, and manage communication. 

Offered through online and off-campus programs only.

 

320 Employment Law (3 hours)
This course will examine the legal ramification on current employment relationships. Current legal topics such as Title discrimination, equal pay, employment-at-will, polygraphs and drug testing will be some of the topics covered.

Prerequisites: LAW211, MGT201  

Offered Spring

 
390 Special Topics (3 hours)
Investigation of selected areas or contemporary problems. 
Prerequisite: Listed in schedule of courses or permission of instructor.
 
406 Fraud Prevention and the Legal Environment (3 hours)
This course emphasizes Federal and State legislation related to fraud examinations including laws that fovern civil and criminal prosecutions.  Students will learn the theory and practical application of financial investigation methods for both public and private sector organizations. Students will work with technology programs that have proven successful in preventing and detecting the occurrence of fraud and money laundering.

Prerequisite: ACC405 

Offered Spring


Computer Information Systems (CIS)

 101 Foundations of Information Technology and PC Applications (3 hours)

See Foundation Courses at the beginning of the course descriptions section for more information.

Offfered through online and off-campus programs only.

111 Information System & Applications (3 hours)
This course is designed for students who have used MS Word regularly and have an understanding of MS Windows.  Topics covered include responsible use of information technology, hardware concepts, the use, development and maintenance of spreadsheets (Excel), the creation of electronic presentations (PowerPoint), and an introduction to databases (Access).  This is a hands-on skills and a conceptual course.  Participants will be required to demonstrate software proficiency in the lab, as well as, through objective written tests.  This course is recommended for Management Information Systems majors, Information Technology majors, and any student who has received previous instruction in MS Office Applications.  
Lab Fee of $45   *If prior credit for CIT105, may not enroll in CIT111
Offered Fall, Spring
 
155 Operating Systems (3 hours)
This course provides the student with extensive hands-on exposure to Windows and non-MS Windows environments.  Included are such topics as interface design, disk and memory management, system configurations, multitasking, data sharing, and the network environment.  Multiplatform operating systems will be introduced. 

Prerequisite: CIT105/111 

Offered Spring


172 Healthcare Coding and Document Processing (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to proper coding using various coding techniques and the effects of coding on the payment process. Students will learn the philosophies associated with different coding techniques, the importance of inference, systems reliability, accuracy, access, and privacy. Professional practices and procedures for using available technology for documenting the procedures in the medical office are included.
Prerequisites: CIT105, MGT140, NAT150
 

190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)

topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.

Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

 

201 Programming (3 hours)
Introduces structured programming using a programming language such as Visual Basic. The student will learn to design and develop Windows based applications that are event-driven (point and click). Record structures will be developed along with file storage and manipulation techniques. The course will expose the student to the object-oriented programming environment. 

Prerequisite: CIS111, MAT 174/181/275/281   

Offered Fall

 
212 Systems Analysis and Design (3 hours)
This course covers the systems development life cycle (SDLC) using a case study based approach. All phases of analysis, design, and implementation are covered using the top-down approach. CASE tools are used as a resource. 
Prerequisite: CIS201  
Offered Spring
 
255 Internet & Web-site Development I (w) (3 hours)
Topics covered are the Internet and its parts such as the World Wide Web and web-site development. The student will learn to cre­ate web sites using the current tools such as FrontPage, and languages such as HTML and Java for the Internet, intranets and extranets. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: CIS201 or concurrent (waived for Arts Administration majors only).
Offered Fall
 
312 Information Systems for Managers (w) (3 hours)
Introduces the foundations of information systems and their expanding role in the business environment. The technology of infor­mation systems will be discussed as it relates to supporting the day-to-day operations of an organization, with a strong emphasis on the use of it in managerial decision-making. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisites: CIS111 and MGT201 and Jr. Standing or Permission
Offered Spring
 
315 Database Design and Applications I (3 hours)
This course addresses technologies for developing database applications. It covers the principles of database design, and database models using Access. Organizational data modeling and designing normalized database structures is strongly emphasized.
Managerial issues associated with database administration are covered along with an introduction to distributed database concepts in a client-server environment.

Prerequisites: CIS111  

Offered Fall even numbered years

 
316 Database Design and Application II (3 hours)
This course expands the student’s understanding of the fundamentals introduced in Database Design and Applications I (CIT315) by emphasizing the application of databases to organizational management. Database Management Systems (DBMS), Database administration (DBA) and data manipulation languages such as Structured Query Language (SQL) and Visual Basic (VB) are covered.

Prerequisite: CIS315  

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 
320 Computer Architecture and Diagnostics (Technology Lab) (3 hours)
This course enables students to identify, configure, and upgrade various components of computer systems, peripherals, and soft­ware. The subsystems examined include memory, disk drives, video, I/O ports, and power supplies. Peripherals examined include printers, modems and various I/O devices. Students will learn preventative maintenance and troubleshooting tech­niques. This course covers semiconductor theory and devices. Operation of devices such as diodes, transistors, and operation amplifiers will be examined. The lab work includes the application of semiconductor devices in practical circuits such as power supplies, voltage regulators, and amplifiers, etc.
Prerequisites: CIS111  
Offered Spring even numbered years

340 Green Computing (3 hours)
Students in this course will be introduced to Green Computing (aka, sustainable computing) which is broadly defined as the problem of reducing the overall carbon footprint (emissions) of computing and communication infrastructure by using energy-efficient design and operations. Technical issues in high-performance green computing that span the spectrum from green infrastructure (energy-efficient buildings, intelligent cooling systems, green/renewable power sources) to green hardware (multi-core computing systems, energy-efficient server design, energy-efficient solid-state storage) to green software and applications (parallelizing computational science algorithms to run or modern energy-efficient multi-core clusters) will be examined.
Prerequisite: Completion with a "C" or better of CIT105 or CIT111 or CIT155 or CIT255

344 Information Security (3 hours)

This course will introduce information security as an essential component in our war against terrorism.  all information must be secure or the probability of winning the war will be diminished.  With advances in technology and software, cyber-terrorism has become very real.  Computer hackers and terrorists can shut down our nation's most critical infrastructures.  There can be no doubt that cyber-terror can pose a very real threat to thsi nation's security.  students will become familiar with the entire arena of information security.

Offered Spring

355 Spreadsheet Applications for Decision Making (3 hours)
This course focuses on the use of spreadsheet applications as a tool for decision making.  Included are topics such as design and management of worksheets and templates, and the use of built-in functions.  Organizational uses in the areas of accounting, finance, marketing, human resources are discussed.
Prerequisite: CIS111 and MAT174 or MAT181 
Offered Spring
 
361 Network Management and Administration (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of network hardware, operating systems, and applications with a focus on design, implementation and management of the network environment inside an organization.
Prerequisites: CIS155 and MAT174 or MAT181  
Offered Fall

362 Telecommunications and Networking (Technology Lab) (3 hours)
More advanced topics in networking and telecommunications will be explored including message-passing, communication between processes and parallel processing.

Prerequisites: CIS212 and CIS361  

Offered Spring odd numbered years

 411 Microsoft Office Mastery

On completion of the course students should be professional Office applications users prepared to sit and pass the MOS Specialist examinations in the Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access or Outlook products.  Microsoft designed the MOS certification to demonstrate a broad yet detailed knowledge of the applications in the Office Suite.  Topics nay include: Creating advanced templates and forms in Word;Working with filters, pivot tables and maps in Excel; Editing macros in Excel; Building relational databases in Access and customizing forms and reports; Preparing and publishing professional presentations in PowerPoint; Publishing to and sharing results on the web and intranet; Integrating all the office applications; and Scheduling resourses with Outlook.

Prerequisites: CIS111 and CIS315 and CIS355

Offered Fall

CIS412 IT Project Management (3 hours)

This course is mainly designed to prepare IT project managers, with project management skills needed to better manage IT projects.  Built along the IT project management lifecycle, this course covers detailed topics of the basic concepts of IT project management, including initiating, planning, controlling, executing, and closing projects.

This course also illustrates how IT projects should be managed, from inception to post implementation review.

Prerequisite: CIS111

Offered Spring

450 Current Trends in Programming (3 hours)
This course explores the latest programming methodologies, particularly the newest web-based programming languages in use today. This may include projects such as  programming mobile applications in Java.
Prerequisites: CISa201 and junior standing  
Offered Fall
 
470 Internship I (3 hours)
Internship provides the student with on-the-job experience in varied aspects of Information Systems. Hours and work assignments will be arranged on an individual basis. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of the School Dean or Designee
 
480 Senior Seminar (3 hours)
Involves selecting a project, systems study, data input and output planning, flow-charting, programming, and testing of the project. A formal oral presentation of the project is required. A team approach is typically utilized.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing majoring in CIS

Economics (ECO)

190, 290, 390 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary. 
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.
 
221 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 hours)
A study of macroeconomics (the “whole” economy), concepts and principles, plus current issues in macroeconomics. Required for business and economics majors.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
Offered Fall, Spring
 
222 Principles of Microeconomics (3 hours)
A study of microeconomics (the “parts” of the economy), concepts and principles, international trade, and current issues in micro­economics. Required for business and economics majors. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
Offered Fall, Spring
 
322 Intermediate Microeconomics (3 hours)
Advanced study in the foundations of microeconomics theory, and current issues in microeconomics.   Prerequisite: ECO222   
Offered Fall
 
420 Money and Banking (3 hours)
In-depth examination of the role money and financial institutions play in a market economy, focusing on the Federal Reserve System, monetary policy, and current issues in money and banking. 
Prerequisite: ECO221  
Offered Spring
 
422 Managerial Economics (3 hours)
The study of the application of economics concepts and principles to management decision-making. Emphasis is placed on the firm’s use of limited information in an uncertain environment. 
Prerequisite: ECO222  
Offered Spring
 
424 Global Trade (3 hours)
A study of international trade and the geographical, economic, and nationalistic characteristics which challenge the firm embarking upon global trade. Our focus is on the multinational corporation (MNC), or global business, pursuing trade in a very dynamic world economy “guided/influenced” by national and regional political and economic considerations. 
Prerequisite: ECO222   
Offered Fall

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Equine Business Management (EQM)

254 Equine Functional Anatomy (Spring Only) (3 hours)
This course presents a comprehensive overview of the basic design of the horse. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the musculoskeletal and digestive systems as well as common disease processes associated with the systems. Other topics to be covered include the special senses, the skin, and endocrine system. At least one laboratory covering the basic physical examination of the horse will be incorporated into the course.

247 Equine Nutrition (3 hours)
This course covers the basics of equine nutrition including the classes of nutrients, nutrient requirements, balancing rations, and the different nutritional needs of equine populations (foals, broodmares, performance horses, etc.). Disease conditions of nutritional origin will be discussed.

348  Equine Reproduction (3 hours)
Equine reproductive efficiency is generally considered inferior to that of the other livestock species. While not entirely true, certain management practices directly influence the ability to get a mare into foal. This course describes the basic reproductive anatomy and physiology of the mare and stallion. Other topics to be discussed include the estrous cycle and its manipulation, reproductive disorders, and foaling.

412 Management of the Equine Environment (Fall Only) (3 hours)
From a management perspective, the equine environment is the most challenging of the different livestock species. Horses are moved to and from shows, training barns, sales, and stables, which presents unique problems from a herd health standpoint. This course provides an overview of the equine environment with emphasis on how to effectively analyze and manage these types of environments.
Prerequisites:  EQM 254, EQM 257, EQM 348, MGT 359, MGT 360
Offered Fall

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Finance (FIN)

101 Personal Finance (3 hours)
This course describes the study of methods for planning and building financial resources, which can meet the goals of the individual and her (his) household throughout the changing life cycle. Focuses on money and property management, budgeting, income generation, asset protection, tax considerations, and estate planning.  
Offered Fall, Spring
 
301 Business Finance  (3 hours)
This course shall focus attention on the tools and concepts for financial decision making in five broad areas: financial management, valuation of financial assets, capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management. The study includes the time value of money, capital budgeting, sources of long-term capital and short-term financial management. Other topics will address financial ration analysis, organization of financial markets, and international (global) finance.

Prerequisites: ACC201, ECO221, ECO222  

Offered Fall, Spring

 
314 Risk Management and Insurance  (3 hours)
Study of the content and application of uncertainty, risk, and the management of risk (selecting among “reduction, assumption, or transfer” techniques). The application of risk management to individuals, businesses, and the public, focusing on insurance and its remedies for risk.  
Prerequisite: FIN301 
Offered Spring
   
390 Special Topics  (3 hours)
Topics will vary. 
Prerequisite: FIN301, Permission of Instructor

421 Investments  (3 hours)
The study of the institutions, instruments, markets, and theories of valuation and investment. Students shall be exposed to the valuation of debt (bonds) and equity (stock) instruments, including derivatives. Other topics shall include the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), the Capital Management Line (CML), the Security Market Line (SML), the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) portfolio theory, and international diversification.
Prerequisite: FIN301  
Offered Fall
 
426 International Finance  (3 hours)
The study of the institutions, concepts, and instruments of international finance. Current and past international monetary systems shall be discussed. Special attention shall be directed to consideration of accounting, finance and taxation differences global com­panies (multinational companies – MNCs) experience in the domestic and foreign economies. Other topics shall include the deter­mination of exchange rates and their macroeconomic linkages, the effect of exchange rates on current and capital account balances, and the techniques global companies can engage in to hedge exchange rate risk.
Prerequisite: FIN301 or concurrent   
Offered Spring odd numbered years

470 Internship  (3 hours)
Provides the student actual experience in applying the concepts, principles, and rules of finance in real-world circumstances. Hours and work assignments are arranged with the business or organizational sponsor on an individual basis.

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Hospitality Management (HOS)

104 Introduction to the Hospitality and Tourism Industry  (3 hours)
A survey of the interrelated industries that comprise the number one employer in the world: tourism.  Introduces the student to the major concepts and components that represent the following industries: lodging, resorts, vacation clubs and spas, restaurants, catering, attractions, theme parks, casinos, club management, convention and event planning, cruises, and tourism services.
Offered Fall
 
215 Food Service and Safety Management  (3 hours)
Students will be required to complete a program that is recognized by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation as a preferred Food Protection Manager Certification program. Topics include: how to prepare for a health inspection; HACCP food safety assurance system; local, state and federal regu­lations and agencies; and crisis management, and the significant impact of the food service industry.
Offered Fall
 
280 Hospitality Facilities Management  (3 hours)
Standard operational functions and procedures involved in servicing the facility will be addressed. The property engineer’s role as a manager will be stressed with regard to guest operations. 
Offered Spring
 
330 Travel and Tourism  (3 hours)
To study the importance the travel and tourism industry is to the national and world economy by evaluating the economic, social/cultural and political impacts. Topics include current issues and trends, travel behavior and motivators, channels of distribution, transportation systems, and tourism planning, development and policy.

Prerequisite: HOS104   

Offered Spring

 
390 The Gaming Industry  (3 hours)

470 Internship  (3 hours)
Provides the student with on-the-job experience in varied aspects of hospitality and tourism management.  Hours and work assign­ments will be arranged on an individual basis.
Prerequisite: Permission and Junior Standing

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Management (MGT)

121 How Business Works (3 hours)
This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student with a broad variety of topics that are fundamental to the understanding of business.  These include the essentials of economics, finance, management, marketing, international business, strategy and ethics.  The study and discussion of current issues in each of these areas will be used to increase the students’ understanding.    

*If prior credit for MGT201, may not enroll in MGT121 

Offered Fall, Spring

140 Survey of Healthcare Organizations and Terminology (3 hours)
This course includes an overview of the healthcare industry and the important concepts needed to manage in the healthcare field. it also includes a comprehensive study of the basic structure of medical terminology that is necessary to work in healthcare. Spelling and pronunciation are emphasized as the student develops a professional vocabulary.
Offered through the online Associate Degree Program only

160 Introduction to Sports & Recreation Management (3 hours)
This course will give the students a fundamental understanding of the career avenues in sports and recreation. Industry specialists present an eclectic orientation of the sports and recreation field. Academic topics include industry definitions, evolution, curriculum components, experiential learning, career and internship opportunities, applied and theoretical research, leadership, governance, and ethics.

Prerequisite: ENG141  

Offered Spring


175 Medical Management Systems (3 hours)
This course introduces the student to computerized medical office management software used in account management, file organization, scheduling, and overall practice management.
Offered through the online Associate Degree Program only
 
201 Management of Organizations (w)  (3 hours)
This course will provide an overview of the internal workings of an organization. It will survey the functional areas such as finance, marketing, operations, information and decision support systems, and human resources. The course will also examine the nature
of the managerial job. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: ENG141 and Sophomore standing  

Offered Fall, Spring

 
221 Supply Chain Management  (3 hours)
This course is an overview of supply chain management and will briefly cover the topics of Procurement, Lean Organizations, Total Quality Management, Logistics and Materials Management. 

Prerequisite: MGT201, MAT273   

Offered Spring


240 Healthcare Office Management (3 hours)
This course applies management planning and controlling concepts for the students to learn how to evaluate and improve processes for the healthcare office environment. Topics include process selection and design, project implementation, capacity planning, and forecasting that are unique to healthcare.

Prerequisite: MGT201   

Offered through the online Associate Degree Program only


291 Recreation and Sport Program Administration (3 hours)
This course emphasizes the history, philosophy, scope, and value of recreation administration. Working closely with municipal park and recreation department personnel, students explore the principles and techniques for effective leadership in the organization and operation of recreational sport programming in a variety of settings. Practical experience is available in supervising recreation programs at the YMCA, community parks, college intramurals, and local school systems. This course requires a minimum of ten hours of field experience.

Prerequisite: MGT160  

Offered Spring

 
301 Organizational Behavior  (3 hours)

A study of the interface between the individual, the formal and the informal groups in organizational settings. Focus will be on individual growth, developing interpersonal skills, and understanding group dynamics. 

Prerequisite: MGT201   

Offered Fall, Spring
  
317 Human Resources Management (3 hours)
A study of the human resource function in business. Major areas of study will include staffing, recruitment, training and development, wage and salary administration, job analysis and evaluation, and labor relations. 
Prerequisite: MGT301 
Offered Fall, Spring
 
319 Labor Relations  (3 hours)
Studies policies applying to labor-management relations along with a history of unionization, current practices, and legal guidelines with emphasis on the negotiation process. 
Prerequisite: MGT301   Offered Spring
 
351 Managing Diversity in the Workplace (w) (3 hours)
In the context of the growth of multinational enterprises and the increasing diversity of the American workforce, this course deals with gender, racial, age, cultural, and other differences in the workplace. The course will focus on being open, sensitive, and fair in dealing with differences and on using diversity as a positive force within organizations. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: MGT201   Offered Fall
 
359 Small Business Management  (3 hours)
A study and analysis of the problems of operating a small business. Additionally, a discussion of the how’s, what’s and why’s an individual would consider in developing their own business. All areas of managing an entrepreneurial operation will be covered such as marketing, finance and financial controls, government regulations and strategic planning.
Prerequisites: MGT201 and Junior standing   
Offered Spring
 
367 Advanced Topics in Human Resources Management  (3 hours)
This course builds on topics introduced in MGT317 Human Resources Management.  Further study of important issues in human resources will be undertaken, including: Compensation and Incentive Systems, Benefits, Human Resource Development, Occupational Health and Safety, and Workforce Planning.

Prerequisite: MGT317   

Offered Fall

 
404 Organization Theory  (3 hours)
An overview of organizations drawing upon the concepts of social and cultural anthropology, political science, strategic manage­ment, and organizational behavior. Topics covered will include organizational types, structure and design, culture, power and con­flict, and environmental relationships.  
Prerequisite: MGT301  
Offered Spring
 
411 International Management (3 hours)
This course focuses on business across national boundaries. Topics covered include functional areas of management in MNES, impact of policy, society, economy, and geography on the international business environment and global strategic management.
Prerequisite: MGT301   
Offered Fall
 
470 Internship  (3 hours)
Provides the student with on-the-job experience in varied aspects of management. Hours and work assignments will be arranged on an individual basis.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair
 
475 Internship and Professional Development Seminar (3 hours)
Students majoring in Sports and Recreation Management or Hospitality and Tourism will be required to gain a minimum of 200 hours of volunteer or paid practicum experience related to their chosen field. Hours may be accumulated from May 15 during the summer preceding the class. In addition, the course will cover such elements as interviewing, dining etiquette, and business career information.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Hospitality & Tourism Majors Only 
Offered Fall
 
495 Organizational Strategy (w) (3 hours)
An advanced course designed to integrate the functional concepts and techniques from the foundation courses in the curriculum. It provides the student with a thorough appreciation of the role of the general manager, with emphasis on strategy formulation and implementation. This is a writing intensive course. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in a Business major, FIN301 and 96 or more credits   
Offered Fall, Spring

Marketing (MKT)

151 Introductory Marketing  (3 hours)
This course exposes the student to the vocabulary of marketing and introduces many of the major principles and theories of the discipline. The focus of the course is on marketing’s relationship to the other business functions and on marketing function man­agement as opposed to day-to-day marketing operations.  
Offered Fall, Spring
 
252 Buyer Behavior  (3 hours)
This course introduces the basic processes of and influences upon decision-making by both individual consumers and organizational buyers, as well as the implications of such information toward the development of marketing strategies.
Prerequisite: MKT151  
Offered Fall
 
253 Marketing Communications  (3 hours)
This course deals with operation and management of the advertising and promotion function with respect to both its positions within the marketing system and its relationship to the other business functions. 
Prerequisite: MKTI51  
Offered Spring
 
350 Retailing Management  (3 hours)
This course includes discussions of retailing functions and management of retailing as a system. Emphasis is on understanding the external environment of retailing and on the creation of an appropriate internal environment.
Prerequisite: MKT252 or MKT253   
Offered Fall
 
353 Marketing Research  (3 hours)
This course provides a study of marketing function information needs as well as an understanding of operating and managing the research process. This research process and its integral parts are studied in detail from the perspectives of providing actionable results and marketing controls.   
Prerequisites: MKTI51, MAT273   
Offered Fall
 
354 Personal Selling  (3 hours)
Personal Selling focuses on customers as individuals rather than target market groups. To do this, the student salesperson will learn to tailor sales call approaches and presentations, negotiation strategies, and service provisions tailored to that specific person and
organization. Given the independent nature of professional sales positions, the course also examines motivation, time management, and ethical issues.

Prerequisite: MKTI51  

Offered Fall

 
357 Business Marketing  (3 hours)
Focusing on function management rather than function operation, this course explores in detail the nature of business-to-business markets and the differences in industrial buyer behavior and the marketing mix from that encountered in consumer markets.
Prerequisites: MKT253 or MKT350   
Offered Spring
 
364 Event Marketing & Management (3 hours)
Examines the practices for scheduling, planning, organizing, promoting, and supervising commercial and private events. Business planning is emphasized as students are familiarized with theories, terminology, and logistics for marketing, promotions, management, decision making, and analyses of customer behavior. This course emphasizes the creation and implementation of core documents to present to prospective investors, clients, and employees.

Prerequisites: MKTI51, MGT201 and Junior standing  

Offered Spring

  
390 Special Topics  (3 hours)
This course, which is offered when dictated by demand, deals with a variety of special interest marketing topics. Examples of such areas are services marketing, marketing for nonprofit organizations, and marketing research consulting.
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in course schedule
 
404 Global Marketing  (3 hours)
This course examines the increasingly global nature of marketing management and addresses the issues involved when organiza­tions expand into the arena of international competition. Particular attention is paid to the differences between cultures and the importance of sensitivity to them. 
Prerequisites: MKTI51, MKT353   
Offered Spring
 
470 Internship  (3 hours)
Under faculty member guidance and reporting to an agent of a selected firm the individual student works in some aspect of the marketing field: e.g., retail or wholesale sales, advertising and promotion or distribution. This real-world work experience con­tributes directly and substantially to the student’s major area of marketing interest. Work assignments are arranged on an individ­ual student/company basis.

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Sports & Recreation Management (SRM)

160 Intro to Sport & Recreation Management (3 hours)
Prerequisite: ENG141

200 Weight Training (1 hour)

201 Fitness, Running & Walking (1 hour)

202 Intro to Taijiquan (1  hour)

203 Coaching Methods Track & Field (1 hour)

204 Coaching Basketball (1 hour)

205 Basketball Officiating (1 hour)

 
325 Facilities Design & Management (3 hours)
Provides dynamic models and options for planning, maintaining, and managing sport & entertainment facilities in the present and future. Concentration is on the design, maintenance, and full utilization of facilities that are realistic, cost efficient, environmentally sound and aesthetically pleasing. Topics include design, construction, refurbishing, finance options, risk assessment, risk management, security, operations, and procedures.
Prerequisites: LAW260, MGT201  
Offered Fall

360 Business of Sport (w) (3 hours)
Course covers topics relating to league structures, the management of sporting clubs, branding and pricing, sponsorship, media contracting, financial valuation and facilities development in a variety of sport settings. The primary method of instruction is case development and analysis. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: MGT160, ACC201  

Offered Fall


475 Internship & Prof. Dev. Seminar (3 hours)
Prerequisite: Senior Standing for Sports & Recreation Management Majors Only

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Corrections (COR)

120 Correctional Thought and Practice (3 hours)
An in-depth analysis of correctional alternatives available for the treatment of the offender.  Emphasis will focus on the traditional correctional facilities as well as probation, parole, and community corrections alternatives.
Prerequisite:  JUS110   
Offered Spring
 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite:  None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.
 
231 Juvenile Justice Systems (3 hours)
The history, concepts, and scope of the juvenile justice system and its contrast with the adult system of justice.  Includes an analysis of the juvenile justice process from initial intervention of delinquency and status offenses by law enforcement personnel and others through release from intervention.
Prerequisite: COR120   
Offered Fall, Spring
 
236 Correctional Legal Issues (3 hours)
An introductory tier approach to the study of legal issues that affect the correctional field.  Concentration will be on institutional due process, religion, and legal services.
Prerequisite:  JUS202   
Offered through Online and Off-campus programs only.
 
245 Probation, Parole and Community Corrections (3 hours)
Course is designed to address the two common options to the imprisonment of a convicted offender. Theoretical approaches regarding the philosophical as well as the practical aspects of these alternatives are considered.

Prerequisite:  COR120   

Offered Fall


320 Correctional Thought and Procedures (3 hours)
Course considers the social, economic, and political consequences of crime and punishment from a number of critical perspectives.  These perspectives enable adult learners to understand the casual relationships between various social factors.

Prerequisite:  JUS110    

Offered through Online and Off-campus programs only.

336 Constitutional Rights of Prisoners (w) (3 hours)

An in-depth study of the wide range of court decisions that have had an effect on the offender. Concentrates on due process in the institutions, parole and probation hearings, and classification procedures. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite:  JUS202     

Offered Fall


420 Agency Management (3 hours)
This course analyzes some of the distinct differences between public and private management.  The theory of controlling, organizing, planning, directing and assembling resources is covered.  Students will develop a course project designed to cover the concepts explored in this course.
Prerequisite:  
Senior Standing   

Offered Spring


Counseling (CSL)

310 Introduction to Addiction Theory and Practice (3 hours)
This course is designed to examine the etiology, risk factors, and treatment of alcoholism and other addictions. Focus will include historical and research foundations with the understanding of the trans-disciplinary foundations of the substance abuse theory and professional practice.
Prerequisite:  PSY101   
Offered Fall
 
320 Counseling Procedures and Strategies with Addicted and Disordered Populations (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and experience in therapeutic factors, techniques, methods, and basic skills relative to effective counseling. Specific focus will include an introduction to the practice of individual counseling with the micro-skills approach (Ivey). Students will demonstrate competence with basic counseling theory and skills through simulated counseling sessions. Counseling skills and intervention strategies will be practiced through in-class exercises.
Prerequisite:  CSL310 or permission from instructor.    
Offered Fall
 
425 Group Process and Techniques Working with Addicted Populations and Disordered Populations  (3 hours)
This course addresses the patterns and dynamics of groups in a treatment and growth process. Focus includes group counseling, structure, types, stages, development, leadership, therapeutic factors, and the impact of groups on the individual and larger systems. Effective group facilitation skills and techniques used to address diversity issues and special population needs are addressed.   
Prerequisite:  CSL320 or permission from instructor.    
Offered Fall
 
430 Cultural Competence in Counseling (3 hours)
Self-awareness, knowledge, and skill development are required in counseling members of racially and ethnically diverse populations. This course will explore a wide variety of issues regarding diversity and multiculturalism in counseling, with the primary focus of on the attitudes, knowledge and skills required for cultural competence. (Corrections, Psychology, or Forensic Psychology majors may substitute SOC360 “Multicultural Issues in Society” for CSL430)
Prerequisite:  CSL320 or permission from instructor.   
Offered Spring
 
435 Assessment & Diagnosis of Addictive & Behavioral Health Problems (3 hours)
Course examines the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders as well as a number of other major mental health disorders often seen as co-occurring in substance abusing populations. It also provides a systematic approach to screening, assessment, and diagnosis of addictive and behavioral health problems in order to determine the most appropriate initial course of action given the client's needs, characteristics and available resources. Finally, it provides significant opportunity for hands-on practice in documentation and ethical decision-making.
Prerequisite:  CSL320 or permission from instructor   
Offered Spring
 
440 Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Planning in Addictions (3 hours)
This course will cover models of prevention and intervention of psychoactive substance use, abuse and dependence. This course provides significant opportunity for in case conceptualization and hands-on practice in treatment planning documentation and ethical decision-making.
Prerequisite:  CSL435 or permission from instructor.    
Offered Spring
 
445 Theory and Practice of Relationship Counseling in Addictions and Behavioral Health (3 hours)
Course is an introduction to the family as a dynamic relationship system focusing on the effects of addiction pertaining to family roles, rules, and behavior patterns. In this course students will gain a broad background in the marriage and family intervention and counseling techniques in the treatment of addiction and other behavioral health concerns.

Prerequisite:  CSL320 or permission from instructor.    

Offered Fall


Criminal Justice (JUS)

110 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 hours)
A survey of the Criminal Justice System and of its major subsystems: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Emphasis will be not only on structure and functions of the various components, but also their interactions. The course will also introduce the stu­dent to the basics of criminal justice research through the use of the collection of the National Criminal Justice Reference Service and other professional sources of information.
Offered Fall, Spring
 
115 Introduction to Forensic Science (3 hours)
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of forensic science and its various functions and specialties from the crime scene to the laboratory.
Offered Fall
 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite:  None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.
 
200 Contemporary Issues in Terrorism (w) (3 hours)
A comprehensive exploration of contemporary terrorism that helps the student develop the knowledge and skills they need to critically assess terrorism in general and terrorist incidents in particular.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite:  JUS110   
Offered through Online and Off-campus programs only.
 
201 Criminal Law (3 hours)
An analysis of criminal laws from their development under common law to their present day applicability under constitutional and statutory standards with special emphasis on practice with the Ohio Revised Code. 

Prerequisite:  JUS110      

Offered Fall, Spring

 
202 Criminal Procedures (3 hours)
An understanding of the constitutional and other legal ramifications affecting the procedure of criminal arrest, search, seizure, and evidence.
Prerequisite:  JUS201    
Offered Fall, Spring
 
215 Homeland Security and the Legal System (3 hours)
This course will examine the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (organizational restructuring of U.S. investigative, security and cata­strophic response agencies).  An overview will be provided of the CONPLAN (U.S. Governments Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept of Operations Plan). Presidential Directives 39 and 62, the Patriot Act and evolving case law will also be discussed. The legal approach to terrorism and homeland security will be examined along with the potential effect of these laws and procedures on the civil liberties of citizens of the United States. Additionally, there will be an analysis of international borders and airport security relating to the 4th amendment. 
Prerequisite:  ENF154    
Offered Fall, Spring
 
245 Legal Aspects of Computer Network Operations (3 hours)

This course will provide an overview of the primary laws and regulations, domestic as well as international, concerning computer network operations, including those affecting computer network defense, computer network exploitation, and computer network attack.
Prerequisite: 
 JUS202      

Offered Fall

 
361 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice (3 hours)
This course is designed to identify and examine ethical issues among practitioners and students in the criminal justice fields. Such issues may include the discretionary power of arrest, the use of deadly force, the decision to prosecute, participation in plea bar­gaining, representation of the guilty, and the imposition of punishment, to name a few. The course will promote inquiry that com­bines ethical analysis with a practical awareness of the realities of the criminal justice system.
Prerequisites: JUS202 and any PHI      
Offered Fall, Spring
 
422 Forensic Pharmacology (3 hours)
Forensic pharmacology is the study of basic physiological processes and pathways of drug metabolism in the human body.  Course work will include behavioral modifications due to drug use, exposure to drug laws in the U.S. and internationally, identifying drug offspring at various stages of metabolism and a brief historical and geographical perspective of the illegal drug trade.

Prerequisites:  CHM332, NAT/BIO310, and JUS391 

Offered Spring

461 Capstone Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice (w) (3 hours)
A capstone course that will concentrate on contemporary problems in the criminal justice system. Will include a unit on career planning in the field of criminal justice.  This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: ENF293 and Senior Standing    

Offered Fall, Spring


463 Applied Research Design (w) (6 hours)
This course provides a unique, integrative research experience.  Students will learn the fundamental steps of the research process including formulating research questions, developing specific hypotheses, designing various types of studies, and collecting, analyzing and interpreting the results.  With this knowledge, students will design, conduct, and write a formal report on a research project in a criminal justice agency.  Students will stay current in the field by reading and understanding articles that appear in scholarly and professional journals.  This is a writing intensive course.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

497 Independent Research in Criminal Justice (3 hours)
Designed to assist the student through advanced study of the literature germane to a specialized topic in the field. An in-depth review of the literature and/or a formal research project is required.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

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Forensic Psychology (FOR)

105 Victimology (3 hours)
This course focuses on the victims rather than the offenders; why they have been recently “rediscovered,” why they often do not report crimes to police; how some victims might share responsibility for the crimes with the offenders; how they can be repaid for their losses through offender restitution and government compensation; and what new services are available to help victims pre­vent crimes and resist attacks. The social and emotional responses of victims to crime are examined. 
Offered Spring
 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite:
 None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

344 Psychology of Violence and Aggression  (w) (3 hours)
Course examines the changes in the methods, patterns, and meanings of violence. Special attention is paid to individual and collective violence in the streets, in schools, at home, within the media, by the police, by terrorists and by the military. The major theories explaining the causes of violence, and important research about attitudes toward violence and the showing of force to bring about change are reviewed. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites: FOR105 and PSY101   

Offered Fall

 
347 Sex Crimes (3 hours)
There are few crimes that shock people's sensibilities as much as sex crimes.  Sex offenders are the only type of criminal who have to register with local law enforcement, have restrictions on where they can live and can be involuntarily committed to a psychiatric hospital at the end of their prison sentence.  This course explores the myths and realities surrounding the wide range of behaviors encompassed by sex crimes.  Students will also analyze the underlying sexual motivation of certain crimes and their relevance to the investigation and treatment of sex offenders.
Prerequisite:  
PSY101   
Offered Spring odd numbered years

365 Drugs and Society  (3 hours)
Considers various types of drugs, dynamics of use, abuse, addiction, and recovery; social, legal, economic, and psychological impact on structure and function of society; current trends; diagnosis and treatment; prevention strategies.

Prerequisites: PSY101 and PSY362    

Offered Spring

 
366 Substance Abuse (3 hours)
This is a comprehensive course that explores the topic of substance abuse from many perspectives including the history of drug abuse and drug laws; physiological and physical effects of drugs on the body; emotional, psychological, & social perspectives/effects; the differentiation of use, abuse, and addiction and how they affect therapy; and comprehensive examination of therapies.  The course provides an in-depth overview of the multi-faceted issues related to substance abuse.

Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

423 Case Management
A study of the various supervision methods and considerations for effective intervention with the criminal justice client.  Incorporates the skills of pre-sentence assessment and supervision planning, interfacing with other branches of the human service delivery system, and counseling techniques appropriate for use by the criminal justice worker.
Prerequisites
:  Senior Standing and PSY362   

Offered Fall

430 Crisis Intervention Strategies (3 hours)

Focuses on the theory and practice of intervention in various acute situations common in work with criminal justice clients, e.g., domestic violence, suicide threat/attempt, physical or sexual abuse, and acute chemical dependency episodes.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and PSY362   
Offered Spring
  
460 Psychology and Law  (w) (3 hours)
Course studies the psychology assumptions that the law makes and the differences between law and psychology regarding models of behavior, theories of change, morality, and values. Role of psychology in the legal process, the rules of procedure, the jury sys­tem, and the psychologist in the courtroom are examined in depth. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisites: SOC250, SCS300, and Junior Standing    
Offered Fall
485 Death and Dying  (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course examines the reality of death and dying as it affects the helping professional, the terminal person, and the survivors. Incorporates the work of relevant sociological, philosophical, and religious viewpoints from a multicultural perspec­tive.  
Prerequisites: PSY101 and SOC101   
Offered Fall

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Forensic Science (FSC)

190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite:  None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

391 Forensic Anthropology (3 hours)
This course considers the forensic application of anthropology and archaeology to identification of human remains in criminal and human rights cases.  Students will be introduced to methods used to determine age at death, sex, stature and ancestry of a skeleton and will practice the application of these methods in a laboratory setting.  The course also addresses issues of recovery and processing of human remains from crime scenes and review actual cases involving forensic anthropology.
Prerequisite
:  CHM332/332L and NAT310/BIO310   
Offered Fall

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Law Enforcement (ENF)

100 Understanding Incident Management and Your Role (3 hours)
This course provides overview of strategic practices and serves as a basic and pragmatic guide for emergency response practitioners.  Emphasis will be placed on how this system is applied to all hazards for all government levels, across the four phases and all functions of emergency management.  It includes the role of national, regional and local services in a variety of disasters.  This class is appropriate for business and industry, firefighters, Emergency Managers, EMS, police and other interested parties.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

150 Police and Society  (3 hours)
A study of the various response methodologies available to the patrol officer in assisting the citizen’s request for police service. Discusses traffic enforcement from the stop of the violator through traffic accident investigation.

Prerequisite: JUS110    

Offered Fall, Spring

 
154 Homeland Security Overview (3 hours)
This course presents an introduction to the public and private sector dimensions of the theory and practice of homeland security at the national, regional, state, and local level.  The perspective will include an overview of the administrative, legislative, and operational elements of homeland security programs and processes, including a review of homeland security history, policies, and programs.  The student will examine, in general, terrorism and the intelligence issues that support homeland security operations.
Prerequisite:  JUS110    
Offered Fall
 
160 Crime Prevention (3 hours)
An examination of crime prevention and security programming responding to commercial, retail, industrial, and governmental proprietary needs. Review of physical, personnel, and informational security.

Prerequisite: JUS110     

Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite
:  None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

212 Concepts of Terrorism (3 hours)
This course provides an introduction into the theories explaining terrorist behavior.  It will examine the questions of what constitutes terrorism, terrorist groups, and what economic, social, religious and other issues lead to the conduct of groups like al Qaeda.  Additionally, students will be required to think critically about how terrorist groups form, what makes them disband, and how knowledge is transferred among groups and group-members.  Further, it will cover the history and development of the term "terrorism" and the development of modern terrorism in practice.
Prerequisites
:  ENG141 and ENF154   
Offered Fall
 
239 Applied Criminal Investigation and Criminalistics (3 hours)
Emphasis on the investigation of specific crimes including, but not limited to, Homicide,
Sexual Assault, Aggravated Assault, Robbery, Burglary, Theft, Auto Theft and Arson.
Students will be required to investigate a “mock” crime scene, collect and analyze evidence obtained and present their investigation in a “moot” court.

Prerequisite: JUS202   

Offered Fall, Spring

 
240 Critical Infrastructure Protection (3 hours)
This course provides a broad perspective of the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) effort in the United States.  The overall mission of CIP is to protect and ensure the continuity of the critical infrastructure of the US that is essential to the nation's security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life against debilitating disruption or destruction from man-made or natural incidents.  Students will explore the importance of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan, the eighteen critical infrastructure sectors and their elated challenges for protection.

Prerequisite:  ENF154   

Offered Spring

245 Emergency Organization and Management (3 hours)
Every level of government bears responsibility for emergency response.  A systematic analysis of the public agencies and an overview of organizations involved in homeland security will be covered in this course.  Topics such as threat assessment, risk analysis, incident management systems, coordinating with supporting agencies, response procedures, the planning function, coordinated government efforts, crime scene operations, prevention strategies, response protocols, evacuation, medical support, and conducting an effective follow-up analysis will all be covered.  This class will prepare the student with information necessary to respond to terrorist acts.

Offered Fall

293 Criminology (3 hours)
This course provides an introduction to the subject of criminology.  Criminology is the study of both criminal behavior and crime itself, and as such, is one of the foundational courses for criminal justice.  It explores the different schools of criminological thought, the different eras of criminology research and the theories proposed for crime and criminal motivation.  Additionally, there is an emphasis on the development of the history of criminology as the basis for our justice system today.
Prerequisite: SOC101   
Offered Fall, Spring
 
317 Introduction to CJ Leadership (3 hours)
This course introduces students to the leadership process by examining the concepts and theories of leadership in order to help students develop the skills necessary to becoming leaders in the workplace, the community and the larger global society.  The course emphasizes the relationship between theory and leadership practice, and the moral and civic responsibilities of leadership.  Aspects of leadership will have a criminal justice focus.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

323 Issues in Law Enforcement (3 hours)
This course examines decision making in the criminal justice system in the United States.  This course is designed to provide the student with a detailed comprehension of how criminal justice professionals make decisions in a multi-faceted civil framework of existence.  This course further examines criminal justice decision makers on what they do, the problems they face, and the many reforms and innovations they must evolve into.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

334 Computers in Law Enforcement (3 hours)
The course is a survey of the use and potential of computers in law enforcement agencies.  The ethical and legal problems confronting society and police agencies occasioned by the use of computers as information gathering and storage instruments are examined, as well as the advantage of using computers in research and agency operations. Students will know how to use computers for link network analysis, crime mapping, traffic analysis and accident plotting, crime analysis and other functions relating to the administration/operation of a law enforcement agency.
Prerequisite
:  CIS111 or permission of Instructor

335 Police Administration and Supervision (3 hours)

A study of management theories and their impact on law enforcement agencies.  Topics include, but are not limited to, agency structure, management of personnel, fiscal management, and civil and criminal liabilities for police personnel.

Prerequisite:  JUS110   

Offered Fall

341 Survey of Computer Forensics (3 hours)
This course will provide the student with an overview of current terms and concepts that form the basis for all computer investigations. A comparative analysis of computer forensics and other criminal forensic sciences will be conducted to provide the student understanding of the forensics field. The student will become familiar with computer hardware, operating systems, programming and networking (including a comprehensive review of internet protocols and routing). The course will conclude with a review of typical computer crimes and common computer intruder methods.
Prerequisite
: JUS202     
Offered Fall
 
343 Weapons of Terrorism  (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of the various weapons available to terrorists that threaten America and the rest of the nations of the world. Modern applications of technologies by current foreign terrorist organizations will be included.  Utilization of such weapons (chemical and/or biological) will likely require a multi-jurisdictional response capability from incident site first responders and possible U.S. military specialty response units.  Cyber-terrorism has come of age requiring public and private coordination of responses to such attacks.  Other weapon platforms of terrorism to be examined include radiological and explosives (dirty bombs) designed to create mass contamination of the population and surroundings.  Resulting decontamination issues will be discussed as well as new tactics the instructor deems appropriate.  All shall be covered with students learning about the various means used by terrorist to create fear and death.
Prerequisite: JUS215       
 
344 Information Security  (3 hours)
This course will introduce information security as an essential component in our war against terrorism.  All information must be secure or the probability of winning the war will be diminished.  With advances in technology and software, cyber-terrorism has become very real.  Computer hackers and terrorists can shut down our nation’s most critical infrastructures.  There can be no doubt that cyber-terror can pose a very real threat to this nation’s security.  Students will become familiar with the entire arena of information security. 
Offered Spring
 
346 Disaster Response Operations and Management (3 hours)
This course covers the basic concepts and operational procedures and authorities involved in responding to major disasters.  Topics include Federal, State, and local roles and responsibilities in major disaster recovery work with an emphasis on governmental coordination.  Upon completion, students should be able to implement a disaster plan and assess the needs of those involved in a major disaster.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

348 Information Systems and Analysis for Intelligence Professionals (3
hours)
This course introduces the foundations of information systems and their expanding role in the business environment. It is designed to provide an introduction to the role of information technology as the principal tool of the Information Age. This course will also introduce the student to the system analysis and design process. Topics will include analyzing a business case, requirements modeling, data and process modeling, and development strategies, with an increased focus on object modeling and project management. Students also learn about output and user interface design, data design, systems architecture and implementation, and systems operation, support and security. A case study based approach will be used to further explain the concepts covered.
Prerequisite:
ENF344    
Offered Spring
 
393 Criminal Nature (3 hours)
An examination of the nature, variation, and causes of crime with emphasis on theories of crime and criminal behavior.  Topics will include social pathology, traditional crime and criminals, and emergent criminal activities such as computer-assisted crime.  An examination of the nature, variation, and causes of crime with emphasis on theories of crime and criminal behavior and the study of social institutions and their influence on labeling and labeling behavior.  
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

400 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems  (3 hours)
Study of national and international criminal justice systems with emphasis on law enforcement. The historical, cultural, and opera­tional similarities and differences will be explored. Contemporary research relating to law enforcement, adjudicative, and correc­tional systems will be considered.  
Prerequisites: JUS110 and Junior Standing      
Offered Fall
 
414 Components of Disasters (3 hours)
This course is designed to overview sociological disaster research, disaster system, and alternative research approaches.  Topics include human and organizational behaviors, long term disaster impact on communities, disaster warning, and evacuation considerations.  Upon completion, students should be able to assess and predict the impact of disaster-related human behavior.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.
 
428 Crisis Management Center (3 hours)
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to effectively manage and operate an EOC during crisis situations.  Topics include properly locating and designing an EOC, staffing, training and briefing EOC personnel, and how to operate an EOC.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate how to set up and operate an effective emergency operations center.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

441 Counterintelligence/Counter-terrorism  (3 hours)
This course addresses the issues of counterintelligence and counter-terrorism (covert information modification and planned preemptive responses).  This course will provide an explanation of these two different tactical operational modalities.  The interconnectivity of these two separate operational fields will be examined to determine their structural relationship in combating an enemy threat.  Additionally, this course will examine the geopolitical utilization of these operational methodologies by U.S. domestic and foreign-based operatives providing security to U.S. domestic security interests.  Lastly, this course will examine the use of technology and human intelligence in their application regarding counterintelligence. 
Offered Spring
 
450 Crime Analysis  (3 hours)
An introduction to the concept, applications, and methods of crime analysis as it is employed in municipal, county, state, and fed­eral law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies. The course will include how to form a crime analysis unit which has effective relationships with patrol, criminal investigation, and other field operations units, and will focus on methods of how to collect, collate, analyze, and employ crime date to predict future criminal events, including when and where perpetrators will strike. Managerial and supervisory responsibilities in a crime analysis unit will also be discussed. The course is directed toward preparing students to obtain an entry-level crime analysis position in a law enforcement agency.  
Prerequisite: Senior Standing    
Offered Spring
 
460 Evidence Processing (w) (4 hours)
This course represents a capstone experience for the Forensic Science major.  Students will explore the total evidence spectrum from discovery and collection of evidence through presenting courtroom testimony.  The class will combine classroom and laboratory instruction and culminate with a field experience.  Topics to be covered include: evidence collection, legal rules of evidence, the chain of evidence, the collection, processing and preservation of evidence, analysis and preparation of evidence, and presentation of courtroom testimony.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisites:  ENF239 and Senior Standing     
Offered Spring

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Political Science (POL)

101 Introduction to the American Political Process (3 hours)
A survey course that covers the American democratic process and the distribution of authority and responsibility between the federal, state, and local levels.
Offered Fall, Spring
 
151 Introduction to National Security Studies (3 hours)
This course provides an introduction to the study of national security and the national security process. It introduces students to the instruments of national power and how those instruments are used to support and achieve national interests and objectives. The course introduces the key actors, processes, and issues associated with national security. Students will have a better understanding of the complexities and challenges associated with security policy in a world characterized by globalization.

Prerequisite: ENG140     

Offered Fall, Spring

 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.
 
201 Political Geography (3 hours)
This course begins with an introduction to the current political map of the world. Students will learn to identify continents, countries, capitals, and major cities. Second emphasis is on the relationships among the physical environment, landforms, climate, resources, and political boundaries. Offered Fall
 
205 The Presidency (w) (3 hours)
The course studies the American presidency from 1787 to the present and examines the history, development, and operation of the U.S. Presidency. Analysis is of the institution of the presidency, its functions, formal and informal relationships, and its limitations within the American political system. Emphasis is on the dynamics of the presidency, including presidential personality, conceptions of role, impact of public opinion, and responses to changes in the environment. Also considered are the evolution of the presidency, its powers and restraints; organizing and using White House staff; executive decision-making; and contemporary views of the office. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: POL101     Offered Spring
 
206 Congress (3 hours) The course studies the organization, operation, and politics of Congress; problems of representation, leadership, relations with interest groups, the White House, and the bureaucracy. The course examines the history, development, and operation of the U.S. Congress. Attention is given to congressional elections, congressional-presidential relations, and the policy-making process, and the sociology and politics of legislative process; legislative recruitment, structure and influence of the committee system, impact of party leadership, and nature of legislative decision-making. Prerequisite: POL101     Offered Spring   207 The Courts (3 hours) The course analyzes the political context of the judicial process. Topics covered include the structure and function of American court systems, court staffing, judiciary, roles of lawyers and other actors in the American legal system. Prerequisite: POL101     Offered Fall   310 Public Policy (3 hours) This course uses the case study method to analyze current issues in public policy. Students study both policy formation and implementation. Typical topics include social security, welfare, education, energy, defense, and tax reform. Prerequisites: POL101 and MGT201     Offered Fall even numbered years   311 Federalism (3 hours) The course examines the nature of American Federalism and the dynamics of intergovernmental relationships; its organization, structure, powers, and functions of state and local governments. The course examines the role of the national and the state governments in intergovernmental relations as well as the state, local, interstate and inter-local relations. Issues of federal grants, fiscal outlook of cities, problems of inner cities, and metropolitan governments are also discussed. Prerequisite: POL101     Offered Fall   313 American National Security Policy (3 hours) Students trace the development of national security in the United States from its conceptual birth during World War II to the present day, including the role that intelligence plays in national security policy.  The course examines how national security policy has developed through succeeding presidential administrations. Prerequisite:  POL151    Offered Spring 320 Public Administration (3 hours) This course examines the management of government at local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis is on the function and control of government agencies, the nature of bureaucracy, planning, budgeting, and decision making in the public sector. Prerequisites: POL101 and MGT201     Offered Spring odd numbered years   330 Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3 hours) This course examines the history, organization, and function of parties and pressure groups.  Topics covered include methods of political action, nomination, elections, campaign finance, and interest articulation. Prerequisite: POL101     Offered Fall   341 Covert Action and Intelligence (3 hours) This course examines the function and functioning of the intelligence process – from collection to analysis to policy use – within the three branches of our federal government, within our constitutional system more generally, and with regard to our need to protect our national security and national interests. Students will develop their intelligence analysis through application problems and scenarios. Prerequisite: ENF154     Offered Fall   345 Economic Instruments of Security Policy (3 hours) The course examines the government's evolving use of economic instruments of national power to promote our national security and our national interests. Prerequisite: POL101 and ECO221     Offered Spring even numbered years   350 International Security (3 hours) Students will study how nations interact with each other. They will study the development of nationalism as the primary model for explaining how nations relate to one another. The course will also trace the recent development of globalism as an alternative model for explaining international politics. It will also examine the concepts of realism and idealism in the conduct of international relations. Prerequisite: POL151     Offered Fall even numbered years   391 Comparative Political Systems (3 hours) An investigation of various types of political institutions, their philosophies and development, and application to social and economic order as expressed in differing systems of national government. Offered Fall   400 The Constitution, Liberty, and Order (3 hours) This course examines inherent conflicts between individual liberties and social order under our constitutional system. It uses the case study approach to analyze issues including freedom of speech, assembly, press, and religion; due process; equal protection; voting rights; and privacy rights. Prerequisites: POL101, JUS110, and Junior Standing     Offered Spring   420 Transnational and Unconventional Threats (3 hours) Students will examine some of the unconventional security threats posed by transnational actors and organizations. Topics to be covered include: globalization, WMD proliferation, drug cartels, energy security, information security, pandemics, and border security. Students will also critically assess how best to organize American’s national security apparatus to respond to these wide-ranging unconventional threats. Prerequisite: POL151     Offered Fall even numbered years   425 Intelligence Analysis (3 hours) The intelligence world is one of ambiguity, nuance, and complexity. Knowing one’s enemies and knowing one’s self has been sage advice for centuries. But how does one know what your enemies are thinking? This course focuses on the conversion of processed information into intelligence through the integration, analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of all source data and the preparation of intelligence products in support of known or anticipated user requirements. Analysis is but one phase of the intelligence process, but it is perhaps the most important. Students who take this course will expand their research, computer, communication, and analytical skills in order to identify significant facts and derive sound conclusions form imperfect and often contradictory information and flawed evidence. Prerequisite:  POL341 recommended     Offered Fall, Spring   491 Capstone Senior Seminar in Homeland and National Security (w) (3 hours) Students complete a case study/project designed to test the totality of knowledge gained in the GNS major. Seminar projects must demonstrate explicitly, through scholarship, teamwork, and /or creative thinking, a meaningful integration of the student’s course of study.  This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior status      Offered Spring

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Psychology (PSY)

101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
Introduction to psychology as a behavioral science, including historical background, human development (genetic and physical) from birth through death, the senses and perception, intelligence and creativity, and the principles of conditioning, learning, memory, and forgetting.
Offered Fall, Spring
 
190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

201 Introduction to Professional Practices (w) (3 hours)
Majors in human services and psychology learn the career opportunities, problems, methods, and thinking styles of professionals in their fields. Students participate in classroom debates on topics of current concern in modern psychology and human services, practice the writing style of the American Psychological Association, and acquire effective methods for developing a professional resume. Guest speakers, field trips, and other out-of-class experiences expand students' understanding of the diversity and challenges of modern behavioral science and practice. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisite: PSY101    

Offered Fall, Spring


263 Theories of Personality (3 hours) An overview of historical and current theories regarding personality formation and development, and methods of measuring personality characteristics. Psychodynamic, humanistic, behaviorist, trait, and cognitive approaches are discussed.

Prerequisite: PSY101     

Offered Fall even numbered years

 
265 Lifespan Development (3 hours) This course takes a life span approach in studying human development from conception through death. Students will examine the major theories and scientific research findings on our physical, cognitive, social, and personality development.

Prerequisite: PSY101     

Offered Spring even numbered years

 
269 Human Sexuality (3 hours) Examines physiology of human sexuality as well as psychosocial aspects of the field.  Considers sexual orientation, sexual dysfunction and paraphilia, sex therapy, theories of attraction, and current research. Prerequisite:  PSY101   

Offered Fall 301 Adult Development and Life Assessment (3 hours) Course closely examines the nature of transitions in adult life and explores the skills needed to successfully navigate those transitions by 'mastering the art of self-renewal.'  Through a process of self-discover, adult learners come to a new understanding of themselves and others.  

Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only. 302 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours) The long past and short history of the formal discipline of psychology are presented in a combined lecture/seminar format. Of primary emphasis are the philosophical foundations of modern psychological concepts and the personal lives and times of those who founded the field. Students engage in classroom debates, find and present in class biographical information pertaining to historical figures in psychology, and complete a project with a historical theme.

Prerequisite: PSY201    

Offered Spring

 
312 Psychology of Terrorism (3 hours) This course provides a comprehensive review of the scientific and professional literature analyzing key research findings on the "psychology of terrorism."  The course will identify, describe, and evaluate what contribution psychological theory and research have made to understanding terrorists and terrorism and the impact on victims.  Typologies and group differences in terrorism will be explored.  Current and future research directions in studying terrorism and counterterrorism are offered. Prerequisite:  PSY101    Offered Fall 320 Motivational Psychology  (3 hours) Course is an exploration from the perspective of scientific psychology of historical and current conceptions of motivation, the force that determines activity preference, selection, and persistence. This course provides both a broad overview of motivational theories and practical applications of these theories to real-world problems. Prerequisite: PSY101     Offered as needed
 
325 Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 hours) This course is an overview of the field of Industrial/Organizational Psychology. It includes such areas as a history of I/O, methodology, job design and analysis, psychological testing, employee recruitment, selection, training, performance appraisal, motivation, satisfaction, emotions, personnel and organizational development, multiculturalism and diversity, leadership, group dynamics, health and safety, stress and conflict management, ergonomics, and consumer psychology. Prerequisite: PSY101     Offered as needed   333 Experimental Psychology (3 hours) Intensive instruction and hands-on experience in the designing, conducting, interpreting and reporting of psychological experiments. Ethical considerations, measurement and sampling issues, and various categories of experimentation are discussed. Prerequisites: PSY101 and SCS300      Offered Spring   360 Introduction to Counseling (3 hours) Provides a theoretical survey of the field of counseling. Major emphasis is on such topics as ethical considerations, the intake interview, counselor roles and client roles, goals of counseling, referrals and liaisons in the community, vocational counseling, tests and instruments used in the counseling process and research on the counseling process. Prerequisite: PSY101      Offered Spring   362 Abnormal Behavior (3 hours) This course focuses on description, identification, and practical management of behaviors stemming from physiological, psychological and environmental causes. Prerequisite: PSY101      Offered Fall, Spring   363 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours) An overview of the issues, concepts, and current research evidence regarding the mechanisms, processes and content of thought. Attention and perception, memory, language, and problem solving are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY101     Offered Fall odd numbered years   364 Evolutionary Psychology (3 hours) Students examine current evidence regarding the origins of human thought and behavior from the perspective that many aspects of "human nature" can be understood usefully as sets of processes that were designed by natural selection to solve adaptive problems faced by our evolutionary ancestors. Among the issues to be addressed are human survival, sex, and mating strategies, conflict between the sexes, and the emergence of moral codes. Prerequisite: PSY101 or SOC101      Offered Spring even numbered years 401 Biological Foundations of Behavior (3 hours) This course is an introduction to behavioral neuroscience, a branch of psychology that concerns itself with relationships between the brain, nervous system and behavior. Topics include the structure and functioning of individual nerve cells; the structure and functioning of brain components; brain/nervous system control of relatively simple behavior such as movement, sensation, perception, and motivated behaviors; physiological regulation of sleep and memory; and, biologically based clinical syndromes such as mood disorders, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Prerequisites: PSY101 or EDU250      Offered Spring 440 Comparative Psychotherapies and Therapeutic Techniques (3 hours) An in-depth exploration of the major, extant psychotherapeutic theories and experiential exposure to those techniques appropriate for use by an entry level counselor; emphasis will be on behavioral, cognitive and humanistic approaches. Prerequisite: PSY360      Offered Spring 445 Psychometrics (w) (3 hours) A survey of issues and concepts involved in the measurement of psychological characteristics such as knowledge, personality, intelligence, creativity, psychopathology, etc., including demonstrations of some commonly employed psychological tests. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: PSY101 and SCS300     Offered Fall even numbered years

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Social Sciences (SCS)

110 Foundations of Success (3 hours)
This course introduces students to scientific research on the psychology of success.  It is designed with the goal of helping the student develop motivation and behavioral strategies for success in college, work, and beyond.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only. 220 Introduction to Leadership (3 hours)
This foundational course introduces students to concepts and theories of leadership to help students develop the skills necessary to becoming leaders in the workplace, the community and the larger global society.  The course emphasizes the relationship between theory and leadership practice, and the moral and civic responsibilities of leadership.
Offered Fall 300 Research Design (w) (3 hours)
A skill development course focused on generating, obtaining, analyzing and disseminating data, information and knowledge in behavioral sciences.  Students will undertake a formal research project.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite:  MAT273   

Offered Fall, Spring
440 Theory and Application of Leadership (3 hours)
This interactive course examines theories and approaches to leadership.  This course provides historical analysis of leaders and the evolution of leadership theory as well as gender and cultural approach to the topic.  Students will gain an understanding of the leadership process and its elements, leaders, followers and contexts.  The course will review the scholarship and research of leadership and provide a synthesis of the contemporary leadership models.


450 Human Services Capstone (3 hours)
This capstone course in Human Services is designed for students nearing the end of their undergraduate program. It is designed to help students integrate their knowledge and apply the skills they have acquired in the program to think critically about important issues in Human Services and professional helping. The capstone course includes development of a professional portfolio which can be utilized towards the requirements of National Certification from the National Organization in Human Services. It is also designed to help students use their undergraduate training and experiences to help them understand personal issues and formulate career goals and directions.
Prerequisite: SCS300, Senior Standing

470 Internship I (3 hours)
Internship is fieldwork in an agency appropriate to the student's career objectives.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing and permission of the School

471 Internship II (3 hours)
A continuation of Internship I for students who wish a more rigorous and in-depth experience. .
Prerequisites: SCS470 and permission of the School

491 Senior Seminar I (3 hours)
Students will design a project and complete a documented literature review for that project. Senior projects must demonstrate explicitly, through scholarship and/or creative works, a meaningful integration of the student’s course of study to date. This course is a foundation for and an integral part of SCS492.
Prerequisites: SCS300, Senior Psychology Majors only.

492 Senior Seminar II (3 hours)
Students will implement, complete, document, and report on individual senior projects deriving directly from and building on work completed in SCS491. Senior projects must demonstrate explicitly, through scholarship and/or creative works, a meaningful integration of the student’s course of study to date.
Prerequisites: SCS491, Senior Psychology Majors only

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Sociology (SOC)

101 Principles of Sociology (3 hours)
Introduction to the basic concepts of sociological study, elements of social life, social patterns and institutions, and the process of maintenance and change in society.
Offered Fall, Spring

190, 290, 390, 490 Special Topics (3 hours)
Topics will vary.  May or may not be writing intensive.
Prerequisite: None, unless listed in the schedule of courses.

250 Social Psychology (3 hours)
Study of the influences that people have on the beliefs and behaviors of others. Topics will include social perception and attribution, self-presentation, attitudes and attitude change, aggression and violence, group dynamics, and their relationship to selected fields.
Prerequisite: PSY101 or SOC101 – Education students: EDU250 or EDU316    

Offered Spring

280 Sports in American Society (3 hours)
Survey of the influential role of the growth of sports and the sports industry in American culture. Examines the ideas of sports building character; providing for social mobility; and acting as a positive outlet for aggressive action. Considers the problems of cheating, drug usage, and the fostering of racism. The values and practices of professional and commercial sports will be compared and contrasted with those of educational and amateur athletics.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Fall

310 Sociology of the Family (3 hours)
The sociological analysis of the family, its development as a social institution, its relationship to society, and its contributions to personality development.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Spring even numbered years

320 Community Sociology (3 hours)
Sociological theories of the spatial and social dimensions of community processes and organization. Classical foundations and contemporary theoretical perspectives as the basis for community research.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Fall even numbered years

350 Social Behavior
This course focuses on how people think about, influence, and relate to others as well as how others influence our perception of ourselves.  This course will also examine how people act in groups and how groups affect their members.  Some of the topics in this course include social perception, attitudes and persuasion, prejudice and discrimination, different sources of social influence, helping behavior and aggression.  Emphasis will be placed on how concepts and research in social psychology can be applied to various aspects of the criminal justice system.
Offered through Online and Off-Campus programs only.

360 Multicultural Issues in Society (w) (3 hours)
An analysis of the issues relating to the economic, political, and social positions of minority groups within the United States will be presented.  Interactions among historical and current social forces and institutions that influence groups and individual behaviors will be examined.  New trends in inter-group relations, emergence of new minorities, and the contesting for program funding and services will be explored.  The struggles over income, property, and power on the interpersonal, community, national and international levels will be presented.  This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Fall, Spring

361 Sociology of Gender (3 hours)
Sociopsycho-historical development of sex roles within contemporary society. Analysis of the significant influences social institutions play throughout development of sex roles.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Spring odd numbered years

380 Social Movements and Ideologies (3 hours)
The analysis of the collective response to situations of social tension and change that take the form of social movements and their accompanying ideologies, both from a historical and contemporary viewpoint.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Fall odd numbered years

395 Sociological Theory (3 hours)
Historical review of the major theoretical contributions and a critical examination of the development of sociological theory.
Prerequisite: SOC101    

Offered Fall odd numbered years

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Master of Business Administration (MBA)

MGT505 Fundamentals of Business Enterprise (2 hours) This course is the first step in a well-planned learning agenda that prepares students in understanding the basic tenants of the business environment.  Students will be exposed to common professional components within the Tiffin University MBA program including Business Policy, Business Ethics, Legal Issues, Globalization, Marketing, and Management (Organizational Behavior, Human Resources and Operation Management).   

MGT 506 Fundamentals of Quantitative Business Methods (2 hours) This class is for MBA students whose undergraduate studies and/or experience need to be supplemented by an additional course in the quantitative skills necessary to be  successful in the Tiffin University MBA program. The course provides an overview of Accounting, Economics, Finance, Information Systems and Statistics.

 ACC510 Financial Accounting (2 hours)
This course will focus on the principles underlying the development and use of financial statements with emphasis on business applications.

ACC512 Managerial Accounting (2 hours)
This course builds on the students’ knowledge of accounting concepts. The focus is on evaluation and use of accounting data for internal planning, control, and decision making.
Prerequisite: ACC510

CIT514 Information and Decision Support (2 hours)
This course reviews basic information technology and systems, discusses the importance of data, information and knowledge management in organizations, the role these play in obtaining and maintaining competitive advantages, the use of e-commerce nationally, internationally and globally and the impact of the digital divide on an increasingly global economy, the formation and appraisal of sound information systems, and issues of cyber crime and cyber ethics.

ECO524 Managerial Economics (2 hours)
This course builds on basic concepts of microeconomics, and places an emphasis on the firm’s use of limited information in an uncertain environment. A global perspective is stressed.

 ECO626  International Trade and Investment (2 hours)
Overview of the dynamic economic, ethical, cultural, legal, and political issues that affect operations in the global arena. Discussion of various trade theories, trade barriers, and trade agreements. Examination of the external environment for trade and investment - the course seeks to equip future business leaders to exploit opportunities presented by selling to global markets instead of a single national market and adding value by locating different aspects of the value chain in countries where they can be performed most efficiently based upon differences in wage rates and national resource endowments. The course will allow students to understand the structural economic factors that govern locational benefits, government policies that encourage/discourage the integration of national economies with the global economy, and the risks of the global macroeconomic environment. It will also help them cope with the challenges posed by globalization (the increase in potential competition) by studying different modes of entry into emerging markets.
Prerequisite: ECO 524 and MGT614

FIN612 Managerial Finance (2 hours)
Financial decision making addressing the structure of capital, its cost, availability, and selection, along with management of cash flows and distributions are the focus of this course.
Prerequisite: ACC512

FIN616  International Financial Management  (2 hours)          Structure and operation of global financial markets: The international monetary system, global banking, eurocurrency markets, global securities markets, foreign exchange markets, emerging capital markets, and global portfolio management. Financial skills required for effective management of companies engaged in international business with an emphasis on international financial management – extension of closed economy financial management techniques to the global market environment. Topics include balance of payments and exchange rate determination, the hedging of exchange rate risk, multinational capital budgeting, political risk management, taxation, the corporate management of short-term and long-term assets and liabilities and financing the global operations of firms.
Prerequisite: FIN 612

FIN624 Financial Markets and Institutions (2 hours)
This class introduces students to the institutions and markets that form the worldwide economic system of trading financial and real assets. The course will cover concepts of financial theory, institutional detail, regulations, and the history of the financial markets.  Students will be exposed to legal, ethical, technological, and global issues facing financial managers, financial markets, and the financial assets traded in these markets.  The course is designed to provide an overview of the financial world, the financial assets that are traded, and the people who participate in the financial markets.
Prerequisites: ECO524 and FIN612

FIN625 Investment Analysis (2 hours)
This class examines the investment process.  Students will learn how to put together a portfolio and understand and interpret news about the financial markets.  It will discuss different types of securities (bonds, stocks, mutual funds, derivatives) and how they are combined to form a portfolio.  It includes background information relative to these securities.  This information includes topics such as types of markets, placing orders, and what interpreting stock indices represent.
Prerequisite: FIN612

FIN626 Emerging Markets Finance  (2 hours)
This course deals with investment issues that are unique to emerging economies since they are likely to afford significant growth opportunities for global investors.  The course will provide a framework for understanding the international financial environment including markets, systems and institutions and will focus on challenges confronting firms that compete in the global marketplace.  An array of issues relevant to firms operating on the global stage, including analyzing international opportunities; developing foreign entry, growth and pricing strategies; financing business operations; and leveraging resources and capabilities internationally will be discussed.  We will discuss techniques that will enhance investment decision-making by future managers in emerging markets.
Prerequisites: ECO524 and FIN612

MAT513 Statistical Methods for Managers (2 hours)
This course provides an in-depth coverage of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn how to interpret statistical analysis and how to use statistical techniques in managerial problem solving.

MGT511 Leadership and Teamwork  (2 hours)
The focus of this class is on understanding individual behavior in organizations and on becoming a more successful team member. Problem solving through improved communication and effective management of individual and group processes is studied and practiced.

MGT522 Management of Human Resource  (2 hours)
The focus of this course is the human side of enterprise. The sub-functions of human resources management, diversity in the workplace, rights of the individual, and the various legal and ethical issues in the area are addressed

MGT531 Leadership and Influence  (2 hours)
Course focus will be on learning to make a difference as a leader. Discussion and utilization of practical principles of leadership with an emphasis on integrating theory and practice are included. Students will work to create a model and set of related perspectives about how one can become a better leader of one’s self as well as the organization.
Prerequisite: MGT511

MGT532 Communication and Fund Raising in Sport (2 hours)
Students will recognize communication as integral to the management, marketing, and operational goals of sport organizations at all levels. Students will also recognize the needs of professional and volunteer fundraisers in an exploration of the tools, tips, and techniques used to fundraise through solicitation, events, and grants common in the sports industry. Applying for the NCAA Matching Grant Program will be a primary learning assignment in the course.

MGT534 Business Strategies in Sport (2 hours)
The case study approach will be used in a critical analysis of business concepts related to decision making, leadership, ethics, communication, marketing, sponsorship, budgeting, policy development, public relations and fundraising in the sport industry.

 MGT536 Aging in American Society  (2 hours)
This course provides an examination of historical views of aging, contrasting from earlier perspectives to current trends and practices.  Discussion regarding the position of the elderly in today’s American society, including level of status and rich heritage and culture will occur.  Additionally, examination of current trends of the elderly in American society will examine work habits, retirement and long-term care options.

MGT537 Personnel Management in Sport (2 hours)
This course provides a study of the principles of personnel management including recruiting, staffing, development of human resources, maintaining a favorable work environment, compensation administration, benefits, security, and system appraisal as they apply to sport agencies. The course emphasizes the value of diversity and inclusion in human resource practices of sport organizations.

MGT540 Managing Healthcare Systems (2 hours)
This course is a comprehensive approach to the multitude of organizations and flow management systems for managing healthcare. Students explore the historical context, social implications, evolution and current state of healthcare services in the America. Topics include the types of managed care organizations, provider payment plans, utilization control, negotiations, underwriting and rate setting, and managing efficient and effective organizational structures. The course also addresses marketing and information systems (both onsite and web-based) for business operations and management decisions making in the industry.
Prerequisite: MGT522

MGT552 Current Issues in Healthcare Administration (2 hours)
The course is designed to expose students to significant current issues that impact the healthcare professional. Topical areas will include Healthcare Industry specific Marketing, Technology, Finance, Human Resources Management, the Political Environment, Healthcare Management Culture and other current issues as they relate to the Healthcare Administrator. Topics will vary as changes to the industry environment dictate.

MGT564 The Politics of Social Security and Elder care Management (2 hours)
This course will focus on the issues associated to insurance for Elder care and of the American Social Security system. It will examine the system in relation to the history and traditions of American society. It will analyze popular misconceptions and will discuss the political, economic, and demographic issues relevant to Social Security's current operation for Elder care and to the program's future and longevity.

MGT570 Sport Mentorship I (2 hours)
The mentorship experience is tailored to specific needs and interests of the student. A mentorship is a professional field experience under the direction of an approved mentor defined as a trusted counselor, tutor, or coach who serves as an on-site supervisor. Organizational work plans, personal development assessments, and career management activities will supplement experiential requirements. Students are required to participate in 100 contact hours, documented in a weekly log sheets, and 30-day activity reports. The mentorship cannot be under the current scope of responsibilities of an organization in which the student/employee is assigned. The mentor must be someone other than the student/employee’s direct supervisor. To enroll in the mentorship, students must have completed a minimum of 12 hours of MBA classes with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and have a learning objective and mentor verification form approved by the Dean.

MGT603 Negotiations & Conflict Resolution (2 hours)
The course explores the nature and steps in negotiation strategies for conflict/dispute resolution, labor/management relations and mediation. In addition, the student evaluates interpersonal skills in order to achieve positive outcomes.

MGT613 Operations Management (2 hours)
The management of operations in manufacturing and service sectors is the topic of this course. The course builds on a foundation laid by Decision Modeling for Managers. Operations Management and its relationships to the other managerial functions in the organization will also be covered.
Prerequisite: MAT513

MGT614 Global and Transnational Management (2 hours)
This course deals with the management of multinational enterprises and managing in a global economy. Building on the interdisciplinary knowledge gained throughout the program, this course deals with cross-cultural issues, sociopolitical and economic concerns, and international strategic management.

MGT618 Organizational Leadership and Group Performance (2 hours)
An analysis of organizational leadership and the practice of leading and managing corporations and small businesses and not-for-profit associations or governmental agencies. The intellectual, psychological, political, and social sources of leadership are studied for their theoretical foundation and practical application. The concepts of transformational and transactional leadership are continually examined and students are encouraged to develop their leadership skills through case analysis, role development, and research projects.

MGT620 Leading Organizational Change (2 hours)
This course moves from the theory to the practical applications of leadership and organizational behavior. An analysis of the management of innovation and change in organizations; the technical, economic, and social dynamics associated with the change process; and the role of the leader as a change agent. Case studies of organizations undergoing change, and biographies of leaders and change agents, are examined. Students will analyze each phase of the consulting process (i.e., contracting and role negotiation, assessment and diagnosis, action-planning, implementation and evaluation).

MGT621 Organization Analysis and Design (2 hours)
The examination of organizations in terms of patterns in design and operation through topics including organizational-environment interface, structure, technology, and socio-technical systems and culture are the basis for this course. e.

MGT622 Strategic Management (2 hours)
This course brings together the entire curriculum of the MBA Program. It integrates the knowledge and skills gained in the program into strategic problem-solving ability.
Prerequisite: ACC512, FIN612

MGT623 Legal and Ethical Issues in Management (2 hours)
The ethical and legal issues facing managers in the public and private sectors are the focus of this course. Current issues, regulations, trade practices, and liability will be discussed.

MGT624 Industry and Competitive Analysis (2 hours)
This course undertakes the study of strategic management at the industry level: it examines the key result areas and the driving forces in specific industries, for example, automobile industry in the US, or soft drink industry in Europe. The course will cover the regional, US, and global markets and industries.

MGT625 Human Resource Planning & Talent Acquisition (2 hours)
This course focuses on workforce planning, recruitment, and selection as tools for facilitating the achievement of organizational goals.  Topics covered include short- and long-term human resource planning, job analysis, internal and external recruitment processes, selection tools, and organizational entry/socialization.
Prerequisite:  MGT522, MKT611

MGT626 Talent Development & Performance Management  (2 hours)
This course centers on retaining and developing employees and aligning their performance with organizational goals.  Topics include: performance appraisal and feedback; compensation, benefits and total rewards; training and development; and human resource information systems (HRIS).
Prerequisite:  MGT522

MGT627 Strategic Human Resource Management  (2 hours)
This course explores the use of human resource strategies and practices in creating and sustaining competitive advantage for the organization.  Topics include: measurement of HR outcomes and their impact on the bottom line; HR and organizational strategy; HR and globalization; and HR’s role in other strategic management decisions.
Prerequisite:  MGT522, FIN612

MGT628 Organizational Theory an  Behavior in Elder care Management  (2 hours)
This course examines the growth of organizational theory from early principles to current approaches and practices. Discussion will focus on the structure of organizations including internal and external forces. The course will also explore the current structure of Elder care organizations. Examination of the various levels of Elder care organizations and the relationship with federal, state and local government agencies and with other local organizations will lend perspective to the needs of our aging population.

MGT653 Management of Aging Services (2 hours)
This course will discuss long-term care and management of aging services including:  independent living, supported independent living, home health care, adult day services, acute, sub-acute and rehabilitation settings, assisted living residences, hospice, and skilled nursing home care.  Discussions will focus on issues related to meeting the needs of aging populations.  Specific issues, including dementia, and other diseases related to aging populations will be examined.

MGT633 Healthcare Process Management (2 hours)
This course explores the design, operation, and evaluation of systems used in healthcare organizations. Topics address organizational behavior, regulatory requirements related to quality improvement, utilization (case) management, risk management, and medical staff credentialing. Students investigate the use of quality improvement methodologies and tools while devoting special emphasis to the application of Total Quality Management as applied to healthcare organizations. The intersection of access, cost, and service for quality healthcare administration is examined.
Prerequisite: MGT613

MGT642 Healthcare Policy, Law, and Ethics (2 hours)
This capstone course will require students to examine general healthcare administration issues within a framework of legislative issues and their impact on healthcare systems in the United States. Special emphasis will focus on the changes in federal governmental regulations and their impact on quality and financial administrative issues. Through the case study approach involving politics, policy, regulatory environments, economics and ethics, students will critically analyze issues for both healthcare providers and organizations related to corporate governance, personal choice, and regulatory compliance. Topics will include applied ethics, conflicts of interest, the allocation of scarce resources, FDA regulations, confidentiality, payment policies, patient rights, data security, professional liability, and global competition.

MGT670 Business Administration Internship (2 hours)
This internship provides students with the opportunity to undertake professional level employment that leverages their first year MBA studies and supports their career objectives while earning credits toward their degree. A minimum of 200 hours will be spent with the employer and supervised by a member of the business faculty. Prerequisite: 20 hours of MBA coursework, 3.0 cumulative gpa, permission of the Dean and completion of internship application.

MGT690 Special Topics (2 hours)
The global, cultural, economic, legal, and competitive environment of business is constantly changing, therefore the MBA curriculum also includes a class which focuses on a topic that is especially relevant at the time the MBA cohort is preparing to graduate. Past examples include events such as the impact of potential terrorism on business or ethics in the wake of the Enron and other financial scandals that were timely and focused on that moment in time.

MKT523 Marketing Management (2 hours)
This course examines the role of the marketing function of firms participating in both consumer and business markets, with emphasis on tactical and operating decisions and decision-making processes. Areas studied include market and customer analysis, market segmentation, and marketing mix tactics and implementation.

MKT525 Information Systems for Marketing  (2 hours)
This course provides students with the key concepts and tools to turn raw data and information into useful marketing intelligence.  Students will examine new and existing technologies for data mining and market information access to assist in strategic decision making.  The course will provide an understanding of the role of integrated marketing communications in the overall marketing program and its contribution to marketing strategy.   
Prerequisite:  (MKT523, CIT514)

MKT611 Business Research Analysis (2 hours)
This course focuses on research methods and tools used by decision makers in organizations. Topics to be covered will include: the scientific method, primary and secondary data, research design, reliability and validity, sampling frames, and applied statistics which are required to make organization decisions. The student will analyze information generated for and by the organization.
Prerequisite: MAT513, MKT523

MKT622  Strategic Brand Management (2 hours)
Course will address the strategic importance of branding and will focus on the design and implementation of marketing Programs and activities to build, measure, and manage brand equity. It addresses three important questions: (1) How do you build brand equity? (2) How can brand equity be measured? (3) How do you capitalize on brand equity to expand your business?  
Prerequisite: MGT622

MKT628 Global Marketing Management ( 2 hours)
This course will focus on the application of marketing principles in the globalized markets of the 21st Century.  The combination of global free-trade philosophies with local market conditions present an array of opportunities and concerns that need to be understood and managed throughout the world.  The course will emphasize the global nature of these decisions and their impact on the management of products, services, brands and new market development.
Prerequisite: MKT523 and MGT614

MKT630 Marketing Field Analysis  (2 hours)
The objective of this course is to develop analytical skills in the formulation and implementation of market driven strategies for selected products and/or services. Students will create a portfolio of their MBA Marketing activities in addition to any professional experience.
Prerequisite:  24 hours

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Master of Education

EDU534 Foundations of Education (2 hours)
Surveys broad range of topics in education; surveys the history, rationale, philosophy, organization, and distinctive components of education; explores teaching approaches, child development, educational principles; and presents teaching methods enabling teachers to improve classroom instruction.

EDU536 Philosophy of Education (2 hours)
Examines philosophical issues in educational theory and practice while considering influential work by classical and contemporary educational theorists.

EDU538 Information Literacy for Educators (2 hours)
An introduction to information literacy: the ability to locate, evaluate and use information. Participants will learn techniques to improve their own and their students’ research skills and will learn methods of infusing information literacy into their curricula. Information issues and their effects on society and education will also be discussed.

EDU542 Multicultural Education (2 hours)
Provides understanding of cultural, ethnic, economic, gender, and racial differences and similarities in American society; focuses on preparing educators for working successfully with America’s multicultural school population.

EDU544 Integrating the Arts Across the Curriculum (2 hours)
Focuses on strategies for integrating the visual and performing arts across the curriculum; provides opportunities to practice applications of lesson planning and to design a thematic unit which relies upon artistic expression of elementary and middle school students; helps classroom teachers see how the arts can motivate, enrich, and extend instruction in science, mathematics, social studies, and language arts.

EDU548 Advanced Technology for Teachers (2 hours)
Extends students’ competence with advanced applications commonly found in educational settings; emphasizes evaluation, utilization, and integration of microcomputer hardware and software CAI, database, and word processing uses across the curriculum, as well as tools such as lesson planning and grade book management.

EDU550 Special Needs Learners (2 hrs)
Develops a curriculum rationale, philosophy, and skills in curriculum analysis; reviews selection, development, and adaptation of curricula, instructional plans, and materials fitting the goals of the school and the needs of exceptional learners in special and regular classrooms; emphasizes psychological, sociological, educational, philosophical, and ethical aspects of children and families with special needs (including gifted and talented). Covers such topics as legislative, assessment, and programming issues; risk indicators and risk assessment; tools and instruments for informal assessment; and interpreting standardized observational measures.

EDU552 Educational Leadership (2 hours)
Emphasizes the philosophical, social, and political aspects of educational leadership; examines research on best practices in developing and adapting curriculum to impact positively students with disabilities; examines the varying models that support curriculum and instructional approaches with the aim of preparing educators for curricular leadership roles within their own school settings.

EDU571 U.S. History of Education (2 hours)
Provides a critical understanding of the historical foundations of American higher education; includes discussion of prevalent themes and historical methods in the history of American higher education.

EDU611 Psychology & Sociology of Learning (2 hours)
Presents differing concepts of the nature of the individual and society; considers psychological and sociological development of these concepts; evaluates basic premises and implicit assumptions; examines the psychological and social development of the ways in which the family, school, and community affect adolescent development, including effects on cognitive processes, identity formation, and peer relationships.

EDU613 Current Trends in Curriculum and Instruction (2 hours)
Debates major curricular movements, principles of curriculum development, and recent trends including content area and national and state standards (specifically the Ohio Standards); considers recent theoretical and research developments related to classroom, current practices and innovations in educative process, and classroom tools including use of the internet and Ohio Link.

EDU615 Ethical & Legal Issues in Education (2 hours)
Develops knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential for making responsible professional decisions based on legal and ethical principles relevant to curriculum, pupils, liability, and finance. Emphasis on case studies related to curriculum and instruction.

EDU617 Current Practices in Classroom Behavior & Management (2 hours)
Analyzes and interprets data, design, and evaluation of behavioral treatment interventions related to the principles of applied behavior analysis; examines ways in which the classroom environment and set-up impact behavior; and examines ways in which special needs students may be better integrated into the inclusion setting.

EDU621 Reading in the Content Areas (2 hours)
Discusses reading and writing tools for acquiring and understanding information and ideas in literature, math, science, and social studies; designs integrated lessons within and across the content areas for use in teacher classrooms; identifies and gains an understanding of strategies and skills required to read successfully in various disciplines; reviews texts, along with techniques for improving vocabulary, comprehension, and study skills.

EDU641 Educational Research (2 hours)
Introduces methods of research in education; emphasizes research strategies and analysis of descriptive and judgmental information for selecting, planning, and evaluating research problems; uses library resources, data gathering, and writing research reports.

EDU643 Educational Measurements (2 hours)
Refines test construction, item analysis, and statistics for test scores. Introduces sampling and probability; linear correlation and regression; tests of significance and effect size; reliability, validity, and measures of central tendency.

EDU650 Analysis of Ohio Standards (Arts, Foreign Languages, Library, or Technology) (2 hours)
Examines current research and trends in teaching and learning according to the discipline standards set forth by the Ohio Department of Education. Assignments and projects can be individualized allowing students to focus on particular licensure grade levels.

EDU651 Analysis of Ohio Standards in Language Arts (2 hours)
Examines current research and trends in teaching and learning the language arts according to the standards set forth by the Ohio Department of Education; provides basic information in language development, oral and written language, and language mechanics; tailors assignments and projects allowing students to focus on particular licensure grade levels.

EDU652 Analysis of Ohio Standards in Mathematics (2 hours)
Evaluates literature and recent research on objectives, content, and methodology in mathematics according to the standards set forth by the Ohio Department of Education; examines history of instruction, current problems and issues, recent trends and emphases on teaching practices in mathematics discipline. Assignments and projects can be individualized allowing students to focus on particular licensure grade levels.

EDU653 Analysis of Ohio Standards in Science (2 hours)
Presents history of science instruction, curriculum problems, issues, recent trends, and emphases in teaching practices according to the standards set forth by the Ohio Department of Education; discusses impact of dominant theories and philosophies of education on current curriculum changes in science. Assignments and projects can be individualized allowing students to focus on particular licensure grade levels.

EDU654 Analysis of Ohio Standards in Social Studies (2 hours)
Examines trends in contemporary social studies including materials and models for developing historical reasoning, geographic literacy, multiple perspective analysis, and social justice according to the standards set forth by the Ohio Department of Education. Assignments and projects can be individualized allowing students to focus on particular licensure grade levels.

EDU655 Analysis of State Standards (Out-of-State Candidates) (2 hours)
Examines current research and trends in teaching and learning relevant to the area recertification requirements of candidate’s home state; provides basic information and tailors assignments and projects allowing students to focus on particular licensure grade levels.

EDU680 ePortfolio Capstone Project (1 hour)
Throughout their MEd program, students will contribute work to an ePortfolio representing their progress.  Various course materials will be periodically integrated into the ePortfolio.  During this course, students will complete and refine an electronic media capstone project representing successful completion all coursework in the MEd program.  The ePortfolio will include representative teaching artifacts such as K-12 student activities, lesson plans, and classroom assessments drawn from all courses in the TU graduate program as well as individual professional development credentials.  The ePortfolio will provide both students and faculty with tangible evidence of the student’s academic scholarship and professionalism.
Prerequisite:  Completion of all other coursework

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Master of Humanities

ART524 Creativity and Its Development (3 hours)
A study of how artists, writers, composers, and scientists develop creativity and how to generate new ideas, considered from psychological, educational, and artistic points of view. Readings from psychologists, philosophers, and artists, broadly defined.

ART525 History of Photography (3 hours)
This is a survey course of topics in the histories and cultural uses of photography in Europe and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. It starts with the origins of photography in Enlightenment and early Industrial Revolution Europe. The course examines the role of the daguerreotype in the US, and photography’s role with war, western expansion, and social Darwinism. There will be discussions on the establishment of elite art organizations in Europe and the US by the 1890s, concurrent with the flood of mass consumer photography and commercial production. From there the course will examine major developments and uses of photography such as magazine journalism, advertising and fashion, social documentary, as well as photographic practices linked to art movements like constructivism, surrealism, documentary realism, and formalism. It will conclude with a look at the more contemporary postmodern practices which foreground the question of photography’s social and psychic operations. Special attention will be paid to the interrelations among photography’s diverse cultural uses and the terms in which debates about the medium’s unstable art status have played out.

ART623 Aesthetics (3 hours)
This course provides students with an overview of aesthetics as it embraces a philosophy of are, beauty, and taste and further investigates the ways in which humans create, experience, and evaluate the fine arts. Class discussions will focus on artistic masterpieces from a number of disciplines including music, drama, literature, painting, and sculpture. Throughout the course students will analyze readings that explore philosophical issues and historical problems of various theoretical approaches to art and will include discussions on the nature and function of the artist, the intrinsic significance of an artistic object, and the concepts of aesthetic value, experience, attitude, and criticism. An emphasis will be placed on developing a personalized philosophy of art.

ART624 Women and Art (3 hours)
Art history as a discipline has expanded over the last thirty years to move beyond formalism and connoisseurship to include divergent perspectives in theory and visual culture.  Feminism provides a framework to examine the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality to challenge the idea of art history as a unified discourse.  This course will examine the impact of women on the arts in three ways.  It will examine the theories of feminism, race, gender, and sexuality and explore how these theories are expressed in the visual arts.  The course will survey the lives and contributions of women artists from the Renaissance to the present, the shifts in the portrayals of women, and criticism of female artists over that time period.

COM520 Philosophy of Communication (3 hours)
This course is a survey of the genealogy of communication and how communication creates shared experiences between people. Through a collection of readings, students will examine how and why society thinks about communication the way it does. Philosophy of Communication is generally concerned with analytical, theoretical and political issues that cross different discipline boundaries. It explores how people live their lives and deal with the conflicts that are inevitable whenever communication occurs in a society, whether in person, in groups, electronically or through the mass media. Throughout the course, students are exposed to the broader study of the field and how it relates to contemporary philosophical arguments, positions and concerns. By studying the historical and social contexts for communication, students will come to understand and appreciate how meaning is created through human interaction, more about themselves and how they relate to others.

COM580 Politics and the News (3 hours)
This course will critically analyze how the news media influenced public discussion of political and social issues in the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as examine how these issues were debated in the news. Drawing on readings from political science, communications, and history, students will also examine how political powers in mass democracies use the news media as a mechanism of persuasion and social control.
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in the MA Humanities program

COM630 Cybercultures and Issues in Cyberspace (3 hours)
This course explores the culture of Cyberspace and the wide range of social, legal, ethical, political and economic issues associated with the evolution of the online world. From its origins as a government sponsored communications network, the Internet has evolved to become the de facto center of information society. In the process, online communication is fundamentally changing how people relate to each other in a computer mediated world. We will also examine the environment that created the Internet and the issues that are emerging along with it. Through a series of readings, reflections, exploration of web sites and online exchanges, students will examine how the Internet is changing culture and society. This will include an exploration of online public spaces such as Facebook, YouTube, MySpace, blogs, online dating, virtual environments and identities, globalization and the legal issues surrounding privacy, anonymity, predatory online behavior, copyright, libel, indecency, obscenity, hate speech, cyberbullying and junk mail. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the boundaries of online behavior and freedom of expression in the complex, rabidly changing Internet environment.

CUL511 Culture and Identity (3 hours)
Course examines the creation and interplay of cultural identity. May draw on readings from sociology, philosophy, cultural studies, literary theory, and communication; students examine major intellectual approaches to the formation and consequences of culture

CUL515 Mythologies in Human Experience (3 hours)
Selected readings in the nature of myth as a working hypothesis whose object is to explain the world and make its phenomena intelligible. Topics for study might include the purpose and nature of myth, the major perspectives used to analyze and understand myth, the role of myth as mediator between past and present, the spiritual quality of myth, the transformation of myth into objective reality, myth as symbol, etc. Texts may include Greek, Roman, Celtic, Nordic and other world mythologies.

CUL530 Cult and Independent Film (3 hours)
This course will examine and familiarize the students with various cult films and the cult film phenomenon. From the definition (or designation) of “cult”, to the unusual, yet vital role in society this non-genre fills, the cult film does not fit into traditional critical rhetoric. Instead, by being a marginalized area of film, the cult film and the audiences of this phenomenon deconstruct mainstream film entertainment and analysis.

CUL 532 Documentary Film  (3 hours)
Documentary films have emerged as a popular medium for non-fiction storytelling.  This course will give a conceptual overview of the form, strategies, and conventions of documentary films and videos.  We will screen historical and contemporary documentaries to examine questions of defining the genre, ethical dilemmas, the debate over objectivity, and the ways that documentaries can stimulate critical thinking about the construction of our social world.  Students will need to join a movie subscription service to gain timely access to the films for each week.  Please note that it will be very difficult to access these films outside of the U.S., and so students living internationally are advised to check on the accessibility of the films before registering for this course.

ENG501 Introduction to Graduate Writing (2 hours)
This course introduces students who would like to hone their writing abilities and work on the writing skills needed for studies at the graduate level. It emphasizes appropriate writing style and academic tone, documentation in the MLA and APA formats, and developing a thesis statement into an argument.

ENG530 The Culture and Literature of Modernity (3 hours)
Readings in cultural and literary identity: 1880-1920. Coming after Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, and Sigmund Freud, the style and traditions of literature, music, dance, and art took on a new reality that shattered old artistic conventions. The course will examine the novels of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, the music of Igor Stravinsky and American jazz artists, the art of the cubists, the dance forms of Isadora Duncan and the evolution of modernism.

ENG541 Creative Writing Workshop: Short Story (3 hours)
The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online.  Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of short fiction.

ENG542 Creative Writing Workshop: The Novel (3 hours)The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online.  Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of a novel.

ENG543 Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry (3 hours)
The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own material in light of modern critical thought and development.

ENG583 Poetics of Western Drama (3 hours)
Readings from ancient dramatic works including those of Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus, and Aristophanes. Exploration of the unique nature and continuing significance of Greek tragedy and Greek theater in the drama of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. All discussion will stem from Aristotle’s Poetics as the basis for western dramatic traditions and conventions. Topics of study from the texts will include such issues as the tragic voice, the role of women, the nature of heroism, human beings' relationship to the divine, and the role of fate in human affairs.
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in the MA Humanities program

HIS521 British History I: Prehistory to 1066 (3 hours)
This course examines the complex social and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from prehistory, to the Celtic migration, to the Roman Conquest, to the invasions of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes, ending immediately prior to the Norman Conquest. This study will encompass a history of the English language as well as an introduction to the artistic, literary, architectural, and legal developments of this period, with an eye toward how these developments have shaped the present world.

HIS522 British History II: 1066 to 1660 (3 hours)
This course examines the complex social and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from the Norman Conquest through the English Civil War era, ending at the Restoration. This study will encompass a political, economic, and social history of the British Isles as well as an introduction to the artistic, literary, architectural, and legal developments of this period, with an eye toward how these developments have shaped the present world.

HIS523 British History III: 1660 to 1910 (3 hours)
This course examines the complex social and political history of the peoples of the British Isles from the Restoration through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, ending prior to WWI. This study will encompass a political, economic, and social history of the British Isles as well as an introduction to the artistic, literary, architectural, and legal developments of this period, with an eye toward how these developments have shaped the present world.

HIS640 A History of Africans in America (3 hours)
This course offers a comprehensive review of African American history from the days of slave trade through today. Students will become familiar with the wide sweep of this history and the contributions of African Americans, particularly in United States history.

HUM510 Introduction to Graduate Humanities (3 hours)
Course introduces students to the important questions and issues in the graduate study of the humanities through an overview of research methods and research analysis with an emphasis on appropriate writing style.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Humanities graduate program

HUM522 Introduction to the Graduate Research (3 hours)
This class is an introduction to research methods used in the humanities at the graduate level. It is a hands-on class: students develop a research proposal in an area of their choice. The course will be valuable for masters students in the early stages of research as they begin to identify a potential research topic and plan their work. It will also be useful for anyone wanting to learn how scientific reserach is done in practice. Topics include research paradigms and methodologies, research question formulation, design of research approach, literature search and presentation of related work, analysis of results, verbal and written presentation skills, and research ethics. Students prepare a thesis proposal or project proposal in an area of their choice.

HUM550 Development of Government Systems (3 hours)
This course will examine governments from feudal systems, communist systems, and capitalist systems, and how these systems influence society and the public opinion. Students will compare various types of government from the theoretical to the historic and examine the influences of these systems on theory and actuality.

HUM554 Social Practice: How people behave and why (3 hours)
This is a course about exploration and discovery of ideas and the world in an everchanging society. Through the examination of a variety of readings of classical and contemporary humanistic readings in social practice, the course explores a complex social world in which locations, pathways, and boundaries are not fixed. The course also allows students to seek connections between “private troubles and public issues.”

HUM 592 Topics in Systems of Human Experience (3 hours)
Selected topics in the study of human experience. Topics may include ideologies, religion, literature, epistemology, scientific, or political belief systems.
Prerequisite: None unless listed in the course schedule.

HUM593 Topics in Systems of Human Thought (3 hours)
Selected topics in the study of human thought. Topics may include ideologies, religion, literature, epistemology, scientific, or political belief systems.
Prerequisite: None unless listed in the course schedule.

HUM594 Topics in the Systems of Human Practice (3 hours)
Selected topics in the study of human practice. Topics may deal with historical, economic, sociological, or aesthetic practice.
Prerequisite: None unless listed in the course schedule.

HUM680 Independent Project (4 hours)
This course requires that the student, with the support and guidance of a faculty member, carry out an independent research project, detailed position paper, or creative project dealing with the human focus of the program.
Prerequisite: Permission

HUM690 Readings Special Topics (3 hours)
Allows an advanced student to develop the readings plan and written evaluation process for a topic of interest to that student, under the supervision of a faculty member.
Prerequisite: Completion of 18 hours in the MA Humanities program

NAT517 The History and Philosophy of Scientific Exploration (3 hours)
A study of the history of how scientists described the methods and goals of science. Selected readings from Archimedes, Aristotle, Newton, Einstein and others.

PHI522 Reasoning, Logic and Persuasion (3 hours)
A study of the development of reasoning and formal logic and its relationship to persuasion and argumentation which gives an overview of logical thinking, distinguishing rational inquiry from mythological inquiry and regulative thinking from associative thinking; articulates logical thinking or reasoning as a process of making logical argument; discusses three basic modes of reasoning in persuasion and argumentation: deduction, induction, and abduction explaining their practical applications in the studies of humanities; introduces possible world semantics and thought experiments, which help the participants to build logical foundations for developing rational, independent, critical, and creative thinking.

PHI570 Atheism, Agnosticism and Skepticism (3 hours)
This course will examine the areas of thought in Atheism, Agnosticism, and Skepticism. While the purpose of the course is not to change anyone’s beliefs, logical methods of argument will be applied to religion, belief, and the question of a deity or deities. According to some studies, approximately 30% of the world population is agnostic or atheist. This course will explore the atheist and agnostic perspectives on ethics, creation, and other issues, while also examining the preconceptions society has about those who challenge the status quo by not following the popular beliefs. The common arguments for and against religion, existence of a deity or deities, and morality will be considered. Fringe belief systems from fairies to homeopathic medicine will be examined using the skeptical methodology.

PHI625 Discovering the Golden Rule: Philosophers and Philosophies (3 hours)
This course will examine the axial age, a period in history from 800 BC to 200 BC which, according to German philosopher Karl Jaspers, was a time when common precepts in philosophical principles appeared in China, India, the Middle East and the West. Jaspers saw this time as pivotal in human evolution in that the philosophical and spiritual principles emerging throughout these regions seeded the world’s major religions and contemporary philosophical beliefs: Confucianism and Taoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, philosophical rationalism in Greece, and monotheism in Israel that formed the basis of Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This was also a time of great violence and brutality, to which the axial sages spoke and uniformly called on people to be compassionate and ethical in their relations with others. The idea of the Golden Rule—do unto others as you would like done to yourself—became a universal cornerstone of religious and philosophical teaching.

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Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ)

ENF512 Theories of Crime Analysis (3 hours)
The course covers the three types of crime analysis. The focus of the class is an overview of the theory behind the crime analysis process and an outline of some of the major issues crime analysts and crime analysis units must face. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of how research supports the use of crime analysis theory to enhance the productivity of police departments.

ENF532 Computer Applications in Crime Analysis, Community Policing, and Investigations (3 hours)
The focus of the class is a study of the crime analysis process through the utilization of applications software (Microsoft Office). The student will develop an understanding of the usefulness of the software and see how each component is applicable to crime analysis. Work will be collected, analyzed and presented through all aspects of the applications software, individually and in combination.
Prerequisite: ENF512

ENF535 Administration of Strategic and Actionable Intelligence (3 hours)
This course will analyze the definition and functions of intelligence in a law enforcement environment. Students will analyze the utilization of criminal and non-criminal intelligence by law enforcement personnel developing responses to a potential or real terrorist threat. The flow of information from raw data to actionable or strategic intelligence will be analyzed. A comprehensive analysis will be conducted regarding military and law enforcement intelligence, with an analysis of significant similarities and differences between the two methodologies and data collection. A case study exercise will involve a synthesis of collecting facts, analyzing the facts that are discovered, discriminating between strategic and actionable intelligence, and then preparing a briefing report for senior operational staff of a law enforcement agency.

ENF540 Continental United States (CONUS): Border/Transportation Security (3 hours)
This course provides a student with an in-depth analysis of issues that concern the protection of the borders of the United States, and U.S. policies regarding the safety of the U.S. transportation system. Additionally, the course analyses the changes in security arrangements from pre to post 9-11 policies, relative to border and transportation security, with a synthesis of the impact of the formation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, on the issues concerning internal CONUS security relative to these two security concerns.

ENF612 Criminal Intelligence (3 hours)
Course is focused on the criminal intelligence process as a whole. This process defines problems, data collection and storage, data analysis and dissemination for action to be taken by appropriate personnel. Students will learn to consider relationships between individuals, between individuals and organizations and between organizations in developing pertinent analysis. Class will utilize both inductive and deductive logic.
Prerequisite: ENF512

ENF622 Geographic Information Systems: Applications in Criminal Justice (3 hours)
Course covers the concepts of how a geographic information system (GIS) can enhance the development of new data and assist in making data analysis more effective. Students will learn about the various types of maps and map analysis as well as the value of producing this type of analysis. One or more current software applications will be utilized in the instructional process for this course.
Prerequisite: ENF532; may include an applications software lab fee

ENF627 Crime Analysis Field Project (4 hours)
Capstone course utilizing the skills for other analysis courses, the student will work with an instructor to develop a crime analysis project. This project will describe a defined problem, set parameters for solving the problem, select tools and options for choosing a correct path for solving the problem. The project does not necessarily have to involve crime analysis but it must approach a significant problem that any police department might experience.

ENF645 Continental United States (CONUS): Counter-Terrorism (3 hours)
This course will analyze the history and role of terrorism in world politics over the last two centuries. Particular attention will be given to modern (U.S. and foreign) left and right wing groups who use terrorism as a means to effect political change acceptable to that group. Political, social, economic and religious factors will be analyzed concerning the reasons such groups exist. Additionally, issues such as recruiting, training, ideology, and tactics will be analyzed to determine their role in terrorism. State sponsored terrorism will be analyzed, with particular attention to those countries recognized by the U.S. State Department as sponsors of terrorism.

ENF650 Critical Infrastructure Protection (4 hours)
This course analyzes the infrastructure of CONUS with particular attention to transportation, medical, electronic, education, agriculture, electrical, water & sewer, banking and others. Each of these critical features will be analyzed to determine potential areas of vulnerability to threats, as well as potential counter-measures that can be utilized to neutralize the vulnerabilities. Students will conduct an evaluation of a selected infrastructure; prepare a vulnerability study, and protective response plan, for a chosen infrastructure.

ENF660 Response: Natural Catastrophic Events-Emergency Preparedness (3 hours)
This course will provide the student with an analysis of the history of U.S. natural disasters and their consequences on the citizens who experienced them. Public policy concerning relief efforts will be analyzed. Relief agency charters will be examined to determine their role in such catastrophic events (American Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency – FEMA). Critical elements in catastrophic event plans will be analyzed. Students, with an analysis of common factors affecting response issues, will conduct evaluation of methodologies concerning community and regional assets.

JUS510 Contemporary Criminal Justice: Issues and Trends (3 hours)
Provides a contemporary overview of the criminal justice system with a focus on current trends, crime problems and statistics, crime control issues, the nature and causes of crime, justice agencies and personnel, key decision-making, and the changing features of the American legal system.

JUS515 Research Design and Analysis (4 hours)
Examines various research design models applied to crime, criminal justice, and agency administration issues. Includes discussion of the philosophy of science, sampling, and various research designs such as historical, legal, action, quasi-experimental, experimental, and program evaluation. Students will construct, implement, report, and analyze the results of a research project important to criminal justice practice.
Prerequisite: JUS520

JUS520 Statistical Applications in Criminal Justice (4 hours)
Explores and applies practical statistical methods to the relevant work of criminal justice agents, managers, and executives. The course will focus on statistical methods to prepare students to be intelligent consumers of reported research, to apply appropriate statistical analysis to various types of research designs, to report criminal justice agency performance results, and to identify and use various criminal justice statistical data sources in print and electronic form.

JUS525 Legal and Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth discussion of legal and ethical issues such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, professional behavior, use of force, factual and legal guilt, discretion, corruption, codes of ethics, whistle-blowing, race and gender problems, appropriate punishment, law and rulemaking, ethical dilemmas in research settings, methods of resolving ethical dilemmas, and classic cases of ethical lapses and collapses in criminal justice agencies.

JUS526 Legal and Ethical Issues in Homeland Security (3 hours)
This course will begin with an examination of the Common law, Constitutional and other legal framework of the separate branches of government having shared national security powers. Then, the focus will shift to the legalities and ethics relevant to organizing for counterterrorism, investigating terrorism and other national security threats, consequence management, and trying international terrorists in an effort to fight terrorists and international criminals. Finally, the course will examine the law and ethics surrounding public access to national security information and restraining leaks of that information in an effort to protect same.

JUS530 Human Resource Management (3 hours)
Provides a thorough examination of the administration and substance of the human resources functions in criminal justice agencies which includes sound principles of personnel management, employment and civil service law, the setting and background for human resources administration, the recruitment of personnel, employment testing methods and issues, the selection process, job analysis and position classification, fair employment practices, promotion, transfer, discharge, performance evaluation, the discipline process, training and education, worker motivation and job satisfaction, and wage and salary administration.

JUS610 Justice Administration Policy Formulation and Analysis (3 hours)
Details the research and planning process leading to the formulation of policy to guide criminal justice agencies and practitioners, including the introduction and practice of skills necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of policy in police, court, and corrections agencies. Participants research, develop, and evaluate policies that affect criminal justice practice.
Prerequisite: JUS510

JUS615 Administrative Law and Management (3 hours)
Provides an analysis of the legal principles and doctrines that govern criminal justice agencies at the local, state, and federal levels of government. The quasi-legislative and quasi-judicial functions of justice agencies will be examined as well as the administrative rule making process which allows law enforcement, court services, and corrections agencies to interpret and implement law related to their legal mandate.
Prerequisite: JUS525

JUS620 Administrative Theory in Justice Administration (4 hours)
Presents an advanced study of theories of individual and group motivation, organizational behavior, management, organizing, and leadership, and other essentials in understanding how to successfully lead modern criminal justice agencies. Focus will be on significant past and recent research findings in the behavioral sciences which will assist current and prospective managers in obtaining results, satisfying workers, establishing public accountability, creating comfortable work environments, and adapting to rapid changes in society. Other topics include decision-making, managing diversity, empowerment of agency associates, value-centered work environments, reengineering, and continuous quality improvement.
Prerequisite: JUS530

JUS625 Education/Training Analysis and Design (3 hours)
Provides participants the opportunity to identify, analyze, develop, implement, and evaluate agency associates’ education and training status. A major training/education project will be prepared to include the assessment of educational/training needs, the design of a learning program, the presentation of the project, and an evaluation of the amount of learning which transpired.
Prerequisite: JUS515

JUS690 Special Topics (vary)
Topics will vary. May be taken for one, two or three credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of Dean.

PSY511 Psychology and Law (3 hours)
This class examines the theoretical and empirical bases for the field forensic psychology. Students will explore how psychologist interacts with offenders, victims, and criminal justice agencies. Topics will also include the role of psychologist in mental health law and family law.

PSY512 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 hours)
The class is designed to present students with a broad overview of the field of Forensic Psychology. The course will explore the various applications of theories and research in psychology to aspects of the criminal justice system.

PSY515 Research Design and Analysis in Forensic Psychology (4 hours)
Students in this course will receive an in-depth examination of the application, construction and design of research as it applies to Forensic Psychology. Content includes discussion of philosophy of science, reliability, validity, questionnaire construction, sampling, and a variety of research designs commonly found in Forensic psychology research. Each student would be responsible for designing and implementing an original, empirical research project.
Prerequisite: PSY520 or FOR520

PSY520 Statistical Applications in Forensic Psychology (4 hours)
Students in this course explore the principles and application of statistical models and techniques that are of value in the criminal justice system. All types of social science statistical uses will be explored from descriptive to inferential, to sophisticated statistical measurement. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of statistical techniques to research in Forensic Psychology and criminal justice.

PSY525 Victimology (3 hours)
This course will cover the broad views of the study of victims at the social, legal, individual, and psychological level. The course is designed to broaden the understanding of victims. The student will be given the history of how victims have been treated over time, how the interface of victim-offender dynamics has changed in the criminal justice system, how society treats victims, and the psychological processes, services, and therapeutic remedies that are available for victims. Various types of victims/crimes will be covered. Legislative and social movements geared at advancing public awareness for victims will be discussed.

PSY530 Legal and Ethical Issues in Forensic Psychology (3 hours)
Forensic Psychologists encounter ethical conflicts when called upon to function in the criminal justice system. This course will focus on various ethical, legal, and professional controversies, and dilemmas. Analysis and resolution of these controversies and dilemmas will be explored. Topics include the psychologist-examinee relationship, the retaining party-examiner relationship, legal limits on confidentiality, the psychologist as expert witness, forensic psychology records, etc.

PSY547 Mental Health Law in Forensic Psychology (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to the psych-legal issues in mental health law. The course will study the needs and rights of individuals with mental illness and mental retardation, the delivery of mental health services, the regulation of mental health professions, and the concerns of society for persons with mental disability. Other topics to be considered include competence, commitment, the right to treatment, the Americans with Disability Act, restraint and treatment issues, advanced psychiatric directives and natural supports in the community
Prerequisite: JUS525 PSY547

PSY548 Mental Health Law in Criminal Behavior (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to the psych-legal issues in mental health law. The course will study the needs and rights of individuals with mental illness and mental retardation, the delivery of mental health services, the regulation of mental health professions, and the concerns of society for persons with mental disability. Other topics to be considered include competence, commitment, the right to treatment, the Americans with Disability Act, restraint and treatment issues, advanced psychiatric directives and natural supports in the community
Prerequisite: JUS525.

PSY551 Psychopathology and Criminal Behavior (3 hours)
This course explores the link between psychological disorders and different types of criminal behavior. It will provide an in-depth examination of the etiology, symptomology, and dynamics involved in personality deviation, and emotional disorder. Disorders from DSM-IV will be covered. Psychological assessment using the DSM-IV and intensive case material will be used.
Prerequisite: PSY511 or FOR511

PSY552 Criminogenic Psychopathology (3 hours)
This course explores the link between psychopathology and criminal behavior. Students in the class will review research on the relationship between psychological disorders and criminal violence. The class explores the various historical trends of forensic views on the role of mental illness on interpersonal and criminal violence.

PSY613 Professional Seminar in Advanced Clinical and Experimental Forensic Psychology (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth examination of the areas of Advanced Clinical and Experimental Forensic Psychology. Students will conduct analyses of contemporary topics in these two areas as they impact the criminal justice system. The course would include both intensive small group analysis, as well as, individual examination of topics.

PSY614 Substance Abuse (3 hours)
Examines the types of abusable substances, the symptomology, etiology, and treatment of substance abuse. The relationship of substance abuse to criminal behavior and emotional functioning are examined. Regulation, prevention strategies, and treatment strategies are examined. The entire spectrum of substance abuse is examined.

PSY615 Drug Abuse and Society (3 hours)
This course examines the various types of drugs, their dynamics of use, abuse, addiction, and recovery. It examines the social, legal, economic, and psychological effect of drugs on individuals and on the structure and function of society. The course covers trends in national and global law enforcement; diagnosis, treatment, and prevention strategies; as well as a historical view of drug use, legal, and social responses.

PSY620 Psychology of Sex Crimes (3 hours)
This course explores the wide net that the term sex crime casts. In exploring the many different types of sex crimes that exist, detailed focus will be placed on the typology and etiology of the offenders who commit these various crimes and the effect that these crimes have on their victims. The legal system has put in place many policies governing sex offenders based upon an underlying assumption that sex offenders pose a greater risk to society than other types of criminals. We will discuss the various legal issues that surround sex offenders and explore empirical research to determine if this underlying assumption is valid. Topics of treatment effectiveness, therapeutic jurisprudence, and the challenges of managing sex offenders in the community will also be discussed.

PSY625 Applied Advanced Psychological Assessment (4 hours)
This course will explore the various assessment instruments used in clinical and forensic psychology that assess individuals. It will address the psychological factors to be assessed, clinical tools, interviews, projective tests, TAT, WISC-R, and other psychological tools. The course will review the gamut of approaches to assessment and treatment. Goal evaluation (of offender/victim/client) will be discussed. Goal plans (evaluation of the entire context/course of treatment) will be examined. Concepts such as the therapeutic alliance, transference, resistance, clarification and confrontation, interpretation, and termination will be covered.
Prerequisite: FOR611/PSY552

PSY626 Advanced Psychological Assessment Theory (4 hours)
This course will explore the various assessment instruments used in clinical and forensic psychology that assess individuals. It will address the psychological factors to be assessed, clinical tools, interviews, projective tests, TAT, WISC-R, and other psychological tools. The course will review the gamut of approaches to assessment and treatment. Goal evaluation (of offender/victim/client) will be discussed. Goal plans (evaluation of the entire context/course of treatment) will be examined. Concepts such as the therapeutic alliance, transference, resistance, clarification and confrontation, interpretation, and termination will be covered.
Prerequisite: FOR611/PSY552

PSY630 Lifestyles and Career Development (3 hours)
Holistically explores the interrelationships among personality, lifestyle, career choice and career development, and considers the ethical implications of these issues, especially as a person’s career affects the lives of other people. Participants will be involved in a variety of individual and group experiences designed to raise and promote a personal commitment to self-awareness and an understanding of how this affects lifestyle and career development.

PSY635 Cultural Competence in Professional Practice (3 hours)
Students will work to increase awareness of and appreciation for cultural differences. The course will require that participants consider and examine their own values, attitudes and biases; reflect upon personal life experiences that have contributed to their understanding of differences and diverse cultures; examine how mental health/forensic issues are viewed in the context of the value systems embraced by different cultures; apply analysis to understand organizational barriers that interfere with providing culturally competent services; develop an action plan for addressing culturally competent services in agencies.

PSY636 Cultural Competence in Professional Practice (3 hours)
Cultural Competence is designed to outline the current federal, state, and local mandates regarding culturally appropriate standards for agencies. The course will cover all CLAS standards that apply to agencies. An exploration of issues/needs for service & policies that are necessary in cultural competence programs is included. Empirical research on racial, ethnic, other minority groups is presented. A policy/procedure program will be constructed by the student that demonstrates application of materials presented in class.

PSY637 Forensic Counseling (3 hours)
This course will cover the theories and practice strategies involved in counseling juvenile and adult offenders. Emphasis is on the evaluation and the development of effective models and treatment oriented interventions for counseling clients in a correctional or community environment. Focus is on development of effective knowledge and skills in working with legally involved and court committed adult and juvenile offenders.

PSY640 Thesis (3 hours)
Thesis is an original, empirical research project. The student will work closely with an advisor, producing a work corresponding to guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychology Association and the Tiffin University School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences.

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Addictions Counseling Post-Bachelor Certificate

CSL510 Introduction to Addiction Theory and Practice (3 hours)
This course is designed to examine the etiology, risk factors, and treatment of alcoholism and other addictions. Focus will include historical and research foundations with the understanding of the trans-disciplinary foundations of the substance abuse theory and professional practice.

CSL515 Lifespan Development (3 hours) This course covers the process of human growth and development which include reviews of major theoretical perspectives on life stage human development. Exploration will include variables which affect developmental processes and enhance or inhibit individual and family development.

CSL520 Counseling Procedures and Strategies with Addicted and Disordered Populations (3 hours) This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and experience in therapeutic factors, techniques, methods, and basic skills relative to effective counseling. Specific focus will include an introduction to the practice of individual counseling with the micro-skills approach (Ivey). Students will demonstrate competence with basic counseling theory and skills through simulated counseling sessions. Counseling skills and intervention strategies will be practiced through in-class exercises

CSL525 Group Process and Techniques Working with Addicted and Disordered Populations (3 hours) This course addresses the patterns and dynamics of groups in a treatment and growth process. Focus includes group counseling, structure, types, stages, development, leadership, therapeutic factors, the impact of groups on the individual and larger systems. Effective group facilitation skills and techniques used to address diversity issues and special population needs are addressed.

CSL530 Cultural Competence in Counseling (3 hours) Self-awareness, knowledge, and skill development are required in counseling members of racially and ethnically diverse populations. This course will explore a wide variety of issues regarding diversity and multiculturalism in counseling, with the primary focus of on the attitudes, knowledge and skills required for cultural competence.

CSL535 Assessment and Diagnosis of Addictive and Behavioral Health Problems (3 hours) Examines the diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders as well as a number of other major mental health disorders often seen as co-occurring in substance abusing populations. Provides a systematic approach to screening, assessment, and diagnosis of addictive and behavioral health problems with individuals and families in order to determine the most appropriate initial course of action given the client's needs, characteristics and available resources. Provides significant opportunity for hands-on practice in documentation and ethical decision-making required for counselors and therapists.

CSL540 Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Planning in Addictions (3 hours) This course will cover models of prevention and intervention of psychoactive substance use, abuse and dependence. Provides significant opportunity for case conceptualization and hands-on practice in treatment planning documentation and ethical decision-making.

CSL545 Theory and Practice of Relationship Counseling in Addictions and Behavioral Health  (3 hours) An introduction to the family as a dynamic relationship system focusing on the effects of addiction pertaining to family roles, rules, and behavior patterns. In this course students will gain a broad background in the marriage and family intervention and counseling techniques in the treatment of addiction and other behavioral health concerns.

CSL600 Research and Program Evaluation  (3 hours) This course will review the basic components of research in counseling and the behavioral sciences including types of research, data collection, research design, basic elements and procedures used in statistical analysis, interpretive methods and qualitative analysis. Research ethics will also be covered.

CSL625 Testing and Appraisal (3 hours) This course provides the clinical and ethical framework for understanding the individual, couple, and family within the context of advanced clinical assessment and testing in service of treatment of addictive and major mental and emotional disorders. Principles of interviewing, conducting a mental status examination and obtaining relevant data from collaborative sources and the procedures necessary for the appropriate utilization of individual and group instruments of measurement.

CSL630 Advanced Counseling Theories in Prevention and Intervention (3 hours) This course will cover theories of individual, child, and family psychopathology including the etiology and prognosis of addictive, mental, behavioral, and emotional disorders. A wide-range of evidence based counseling and therapy approaches across age groups and diagnostic categories will be emphasized. Ethical practice issues will also be covered.

CSL650  Supervision and Ethics (3 hours)
The course will cover advanced models of clinical supervision and ethical decision making in behavioral health.  The legal context of supervision and ethical decision making will also be addressed.

SCS670 Internship—Addiction Counseling 
Students will engage in a supervised professional experience which requires delivery of addiction clinical services under the supervision of an appropriately licensed or credentialed person.

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