Master of Humanities Courses

Master of Humanities: Interdisciplinary Core

  • ART623 - Aesthetics
  • ENG564 - Literary Theory
  • HUM510 - Introduction to Graduate Humanities

 

Humanities Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • HUM531 - Studies in History
  • HUM532 - Studies in Philosophy
  • HUM533 - Studies in Human, Political, and Social Sciences
  • ARTXXX - Any one ART prefix course
  • COMXXX - Any one COM prefix course
  • ENGXXX - Any one ENG prefix course
  • Or up to nine hours of transfer credit with an ART, COM, ENG, HUM, PHI, Film prefix or equivalent with approval of the Program Chair
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project or HUM681 - M.Hum. Comprehensive Exam


Art and Visual Media Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • ART515 - Teaching College Art
  • ART524 - Creativity and Its Development
  • ART525 - History of Photography
  • ART561 - Survey of Western Art
  • ART563 - The Graphic Novel
  • ART624 - Women in Art
  • Art and Visual Media Electives:
  • ART530 - Cult and Independent Film
  • ART533 - Film Censorship
  • ART534 - Third Cinema
  • ART535 - Classic Hollywood Cinema
  • ART562 - Film Theory
  • COM532 - Documentary Film
  • Or up to nine hours of transfer credit with an ART prefix or equivalent with approval of the Program Chair
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project or HUM681 - M.Hum. Comprehensive Exam

 

 

Communication Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • COM520 - Philosophy of Communication
  • COM522 - Logic, Reasoning, and Persuasion
  • COM531 - Transmedia Storytelling
  • COM532 - Documentarty Film
  • COM580 - Politics and the News
  • COM625 - Philosophers and Philosophies of the Axial Age
  • COM630 - Cybercultures and Issues in Cyberspace
  • COM631 - New Media
  • Or up to nine hours of transfer credit with an COM prefix or equivalent with approval of the Program Chair
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project or HUM681 - M.Hum. Comprehensive Exam

      

Creative Writing Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • ART524 - Creativity and Its Development
  • ENG515 - Teaching College English
  • ENG541 - Creative Writing: Short Story
  • ENG542 - Creative Writing: The Novel
  • ENG543 - Creative Writing: Poetry
  • ENG544 - Creative Writing: Genre Writing
  • ENG545 - Creative Writing: Performance Writing
  • ART524 - Creativity and Its Development
  • ENG570 - Ethnic Voices, Poetry
  • ENG583 - Poetics of Western Drama
  • Or up to nine hours of transfer credit with an ENG prefix or equivalent with approval of the Program Chair
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project
 

English Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • English Concentration Core:
  • ENG561 - Survey of British Literature
  • ENG562 - Survey of American Literature
  • ENG563 - Survey of World Literature
  • English Electives:
  • ENG515 - Teaching Freshman Writing
  • ENG530 - The Culture and Literature of Modernity
  • ENG531 - Studies in Genre Fiction
  • ENG541 - Creative Writing: Short Story
  • ENG542 - Creative "Writing: The Novel
  • ENG543 - Creative Writing: Poetry
  • ENG544 - Creative Writing: Genre Writing
  • ENG545 - Creative Writing: Performance Writing
  • ENG570 - Ethnic Voices, Poetry
  • ENG571 - Women in Literature
  • ENG583 - Poetics of Western Drama
  • Or up to nine hours of transfer credit with an ENG prefix or equivalent with approval of the Program Chair
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project or HUM681 - M.Hum. Comprehensive Exam
      
 

Film Studies Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • ART and Visual Media Concentration Core:
  • ART515 - Teaching College Art
  • ART530 - Cult and Independent Film
  • COM532 - Documentary Film
  • ART533 - Film Censorship
  • ART534 - Third Cinema
  • ART535 - Classic Hollywood Cinema
  • ART562 - Film Theory
  • Or up to nine hours of transfer credit with an ART or Film Studies prefix or equivalent with approval of the Program Chair
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project or HUM681 - M.Hum. Comprehensive Exam
 

Individualized Studies Concentration:

  • Interdisciplinary Core
  • At least six courses chosen by the student integrated into a coherent course of study explained within the student's program rationale.
  • HUM680 - Capstone Project or HUM681 - M.Hum. Comprehensive Exam

ART515 Teaching College Art ................................................................3 hours

This course investigates the practical issues and challenges of teaching art in a college setting, including teaching studio art, art appreciation, and art history.  Students will learn to develop effective syllabi, identify and articulate learning objectives, design effective projects, teach with artifacts and objects, facilitate engaging discussions, and methods of assessment in the arts and the critique process.  Students will develop a portfolio that includes a teaching philosophy, syllabi, and sample lesson plans.  Problem solving on the individual and group level will be stressed.  Note:  This course will require several scheduled Live Chat sessions.

Offered Summer



ART524 Creativity and Its Development ....................................................3 hours

A study of how artists, writers, composers, and scientists develop creativity and how to generate new ideas, considered from psychological, educational, and artistic points of view. Readings from psychologists, philosophers, and artists, broadly defined.

Offered Summer



ART525 History of Photography ................................................................3 hours

This is a survey course of topics in the histories and cultural uses of photography in Europe and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. It starts with the origins of photography in Enlightenment and early Industrial Revolution Europe. The course examines the role of the daguerreotype in the US, and photography’s role with war, western expansion, and social Darwinism. There will be discussions on the establishment of elite art organizations in Europe and the US by the 1890s, concurrent with the flood of mass consumer photography and commercial production. From there the course will examine major developments and uses of photography such as magazine journalism, advertising and fashion, social documentary, as well as photographic practices linked to art movements like constructivism, surrealism, documentary realism, and formalism. It will conclude with a look at the more contemporary postmodern practices which foreground the question of photography’s social and psychic operations. Special attention will be paid to the interrelations among photography’s diverse cultural uses and the terms in which debates about the medium’s unstable art status have played out.

Offered Spring even numbered years



ART530 Cult and Independent Film..........................................................3 hours

This course will examine and familiarize the students with various cult films and the cult film phenomenon. From the definition (or designation) of “cult”, to the unusual, yet vital role in society this non-genre fills, the cult film does not fit into traditional critical rhetoric. Instead, by being a marginalized area of film, the cult film and the audiences of this phenomenon deconstruct mainstream film entertainment and analysis.

Offered Summer



ART532 Documentary Film .....................................................................3 hours

Documentary films have emerged as a popular medium for non-fiction storytelling. This course will give a conceptual overview of the form, strategies, and conventions of documentary films and videos. We will screen historical and contemporary documentaries to examine questions of defining the genre, ethical dilemmas, the debate over objectivity, and the ways that documentaries can stimulate critical thinking about the construction of our social world. Students will need to join a movie subscription service to gain timely access to the films for each week. Please note that it will be very difficult to access these films outside of the U.S., and so students living internationally are advised to check on the accessibility of the films before registering for this course.

Offered Fall even numbered years



ART561 Survey of Western Art History ....................................................................3 hours

This course is an introduction to the art of the West from prehistory to the present.  Works will be studied within their historical, religious, political, economic, aesthetic, and social contexts.  Methodologies of the discipline of art history will be explored, as well as primary source texts from the cultures in which these works were created.

Offered Fall odd numbered years.



ART623 Aesthetics......................................................................................3 hours

This course provides students with an overview of aesthetics as it embraces a philosophy of art, beauty, and taste and further investigates the ways in which humans create, experience, and evaluate the fine arts. Class discussions will focus on artistic masterpieces from a number of disciplines including music, drama, literature, painting, and sculpture. Throughout the course students will analyze readings that explore philosophical issues and historical problems of various theoretical approaches to art and will include discussions on the nature and function of the artist, the intrinsic significance of an artistic object, and the concepts of aesthetic value, experience, attitude, and criticism. An emphasis will be placed on developing a personalized philosophy of art.

Offered Spring and Summer



ART624 Women and Art ............................................................................3 hours

Art history as a discipline has expanded over the last thirty years to move beyond formalism and connoisseurship to include divergent perspectives in theory and visual culture. Feminism provides a framework to examine the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality to challenge the idea of art history as a unified discourse. This course will examine the impact of women on the arts in three ways. It will examine the theories of feminism, race, gender, and sexuality and explore how these theories are expressed in the visual arts. The course will survey the lives and contributions of women artists from the Renaissance to the present, the shifts in the portrayals of women, and criticism of female artists over that time period.

Offered Spring odd numbered years



COM520 Philosophy of Communication....................................................3 hours

This course is a survey of the genealogy of communication and how communication creates shared experiences between people. Through a collection of readings, students will examine how and why society thinks about communication the way it does. Philosophy of Communication is generally concerned with analytical, theoretical and political issues that cross different discipline boundaries. It explores how people live their lives and deal with the conflicts that are inevitable whenever communication occurs in a society, whether in person, in groups, electronically or through the mass media. Throughout the course, students are exposed to the broader study of the field and how it relates to contemporary philosophical arguments, positions and concerns. By studying the historical and social contexts for communication, students will come to understand and appreciate how meaning is created through human interaction, more about themselves and how they relate to others.

Offered Spring even numbered years



COM522 Reasoning, Logic and Persuasion ..................................................3 hours

A study of the development of reasoning and formal logic and its relationship to persuasion and argumentation which gives an overview of logical thinking, distinguishing rational inquiry from mythological inquiry and regulative thinking from associative thinking; articulates logical thinking or reasoning as a process of making logical argument; discusses three basic modes of reasoning in persuasion and argumentation: deduction, induction, and abduction explaining their practical applications in the studies of humanities; introduces possible world semantics and thought experiments, which help the participants to build logical foundations for developing rational, independent, critical, and creative thinking

Offered Fall odd numbered years



COM532 Documentary Film ......................................................................3 hours

Documentary films have emerged as a popular medium for non-fiction storytelling. This course will give a conceptual overview of the form, strategies, and conventions of documentary films and videos. We will screen historical and contemporary documentaries to examine questions of defining the genre, ethical dilemmas, the debate over objectivity, and the ways that documentaries can stimulate critical thinking about the construction of our social world. Students will need to join a movie subscription service to gain timely access to the films for each week. Please note that it will be very difficult to access these films outside of the U.S., and so students living internationally are advised to check on the accessibility of the films before registering for this course.

Offered Fall even numbered years

COM580 Politics and the News..................................................................3 hours

This course will critically analyze how the news media influenced public discussion of political and social issues in the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as examine how these issues were debated in the news. Drawing on readings from political science, communications, and history, students will also examine how political powers in mass democracies use the news media as a mechanism of persuasion and social control.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in the MA Humanities program.


Offered Spring odd numbered years

COM625 Discovering the Golden Rule: Philosophers and Philosophies ...................3 hours

This course will examine the axial age, a period in history from 800 BC to 200 BC which, according to German philosopher Karl Jaspers, was a time when common precepts in philosophical principles appeared in China, India, the Middle East and the West. Jaspers saw this time as pivotal in human evolution in that the philosophical and spiritual principles emerging throughout these regions seeded the world’s major religions and contemporary philosophical beliefs: Confucianism and Taoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, philosophical rationalism in Greece, and monotheism in Israel that formed the basis of Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This was also a time of great violence and brutality, to which the axial sages spoke and uniformly called on people to be compassionate and ethical in their relations with others. The idea of the Golden Rule ‘do unto others as you would like done to yourself‘ became a universal cornerstone of religious and philosophical teaching.

Offered Fall even numbered years



COM630 Cybercultures and Issues in Cyberspace ....................................3 hours

This course explores the culture of Cyberspace and the wide range of social, legal, ethical, political and economic issues associated with the evolution of the online world. From its origins as a government sponsored communications network, the Internet has evolved to become the de facto center of information society. In the process, online communication is fundamentally changing how people relate to each other in a computer mediated world. We will also examine the environment that created the Internet and the issues that are emerging along with it. Through a series of readings, reflections, exploration of web sites and online exchanges, students will examine how the Internet is changing culture and society. This will include an exploration of online public spaces such as Facebook, YouTube, MySpace, blogs, online dating, virtual environments and identities, globalization and the legal issues surrounding privacy, anonymity, predatory online behavior, copyright, libel, indecency, obscenity, hate speech, cyberbullying and junk mail. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the boundaries of online behavior and freedom of expression in the complex, rabidly changing Internet environment.

Offered Fall even numbered years



ENG501 Introduction to Graduate Writing................................................2 hours

This course introduces students who would like to hone their writing abilities and work on the writing skills needed for studies at the graduate level. It emphasizes appropriate writing style and academic tone, documentation in the MLA and APA formats, and developing a thesis statement into an argument.

Offered Summer



ENG515 Teaching College English ....................................................................3 hours

This course will investigate both theoretical and practical issues related to teaching Freshman Composition.  Topics will include developing effective syllabi, identifying and articulating learning objectives, designing effective writing assignments, assessing college writing, understanding and creating rubrics, and developing an effective critique process.  Students will develop a portfolio that includes a teaching philosophy, syllabi, and sample lesson plans.  The final assignment will be the development of a syllabus with a paper explaining the rationale for that syllabus in terms of pedagogical goals for the course and best teaching practices.

Offered Summer



ENG530 The Culture and Literature of Modernity ....................................3 hours

Readings in cultural and literary identity: 1880-1920. Coming after Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, and Sigmund Freud, the style and traditions of literature, music, dance, and art took on a new reality that shattered old artistic conventions. The course will examine the novels of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, the music of Igor Stravinsky and American jazz artists, the art of the cubists, the dance forms of Isadora Duncan and the evolution of modernism.

Offered Fall even numbered years

 

ENG531  Studies in Genre Fiction .............................................................3 hours

This course critically examines a variety of forms of genre fiction, including but not limited to science fiction and fantasy literature, gothic and horror fiction, young adult fiction, children’s literature, and romance and western literature.  The characteristics, limits, and boundaries of genre will be explored along with a consideration of these literatures from theoretical and sociological perspectives. 

 

ENG541 Creative Writing Workshop: Short Story ....................................3 hours

The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of short fiction.

Offered Fall        



ENG542 Creative Writing Workshop: The Novel ......................................3 hours

The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of a novel.

Offered Spring



ENG543 Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry ............................................3 hours

The Creative Writing Workshops are writing courses in the tradition of the classic writer’s workshop, but with the advantage of being online. Students will write and criticize their own and each other’s material in light of critical study of the writing of poetry.

Offered Summer



ENG561 Survey of British Literature ....................................................................3 hours

This course focuses primarily on canonical texts in British Literature from Beowulf to the twentieth century in a variety of genres, including but not limited to poetry, drama, short stories, novels, utopian literature, and manifestos.  Authors and works may include, but are not limited to, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer, Sydney, Shakespeare, Dryden, Milton, Pope, Swift, Wollstonecraft, the Romantics, Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, The Brownings, the Rossettis, Wilde and the Modernists.

Offered Spring odd numbered years



ENG562 Survey of American Literature ....................................................................3 hours

This course focuses primarily on canonical texts in American literature from the Native American period to the present in a variety of genres, including but not limited to poetry, drama, short stories, and novels. Authors and works may include, but are not limited to, early Native American literature, literature from the period of Spanish colonization, British colonial-era literature, nineteenth-century literature, American modernism, sixties literature, and contemporary  American literature.  Authors and movements may include Bradstreet, Freneau, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Twain, Cooper, Hawthrone, Melville, Eliot, Pound, H.D., Djuna Barnes, Salinger, Updike, Pynchon, Oates, Erdrich, Dillard, Transcendentalism, Realism, the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, the Beat Poets and 60s literature.

Offered Spring even numbered years



ENG563 Survey of World Literature ....................................................................3 hours

This course focuses primarily on significant texts in World literature from antiquity to the twentieth century in a variety of genres, including but not limited to mythology, creation stories, poetry, drama, short stories, and novels.  Authors and works may include, but are not limited to, Gilgamesh, continental European literature, literature from the Spanish Americas, Caribbean literature, Middle Eastern and Indian literature, African literature, Chicano/a literature, and Asian literature.  Authors may include but are not limited to Homer, Virgil, Dante, Ibsen, Beckett, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekov, Paz, Borges, Marquez, Allende, Rushdie, V.S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Shani Mooto, Sushako Endo, Murakami, Amy Tan, Chinua Achebe, and others.

Offered Fall odd numbered years



ENG564 Literary Theory ..............................................................................3 hours

This course studies selected texts and figures important to the history of textual interpretation from the classical era to the twentieth century, including works b Plato, Aristotle, Dante, Dryden, Wordsworth, Arnold, Nietzsche and others, and contemporary approaches such as Marxist, psychological, structuralist, post-structuralist and postmodernist, feminist, postcolonial, and cultural studies.  Contemporary theorists such as Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, Jean Baudrillard, Michel Foucault, and Jean-Francois Lyotard will be studies and their central concepts applied to literary texts.  Students will learn to consider multiple interpretations of a text and learn to examine the assumptions underlying a variety of interpretive strategies.  Students will also explore the interrelationships between writer, reader, and text.

Offered Fall, Spring, Summer beginning Spring 2013



ENG570 Ethnic Voices: Poetry ..................................................................3 hours

Ethnic Voices: Poetry will examine the contributions of ethnic poets in the United States by closely analyzing various texts written by Asian Americans, African and Caribbean Americans, and Hispanic Americans. The focus will be various issues and themes such as immigration, migration, exile, oppression, spirituality, storytelling, identity, self-representation, culture, and history. Major voices will be studied along with emerging writers. Multicultural literary theory and cultural criticism will be used to analyze the texts.

Offered Fall odd numbered years

 

ENG571 Women and Literature ..................................................................3 hours

This course examines perceptions of women and their roles in society as represented in a variety of genres of literature from different time periods and cultures. The course offers a number of works by significant American and European women authors as well as literature about women or in which the situation and position of women forms a major aspect of the text.  This course also requires that students explore a variety of significant literary critical and theoretical approaches and articles about women in literature.

 Offered every Spring

ENG583 Poetics of Western Drama............................................................3 hours

Readings from ancient dramatic works including those of Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus, and Aristophanes. Exploration of the unique nature and continuing significance of Greek tragedy and Greek theater in the drama of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. All discussion will stem from Aristotle’s Poetics as the basis for western dramatic traditions and conventions. Topics of study from the texts will include such issues as the tragic voice, the role of women, the nature of heroism, human beings’ relationship to the divine, and the role of fate in human affairs.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in the MA Humanities program


Offered Fall even numbered years

HUM510 Introduction to Graduate Humanities ........................................3 hours

This course orients students to humanities as a field of study, reviews graduate level writing and MLA documentation style, and reviews research methods.  Students will also receive initial instruction in the use of various technologies needed to participate in Tiffin University’s online programs, including but not limited to Moodle, Word, discussion boards, live chats, turnitin.com, etc.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Humanities graduate program


Offered Fall, Spring and Summer


HUM531 Studies in History ....................................................................3 hours

This course rotates topics in historical studies, including but not limited to Medieval and Early Modern British History, Restoration to Twentieth-Century British History, the History of Africans in the Americas, and other topics. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Offered Summer



HUM532 Studies in Philosophy ....................................................................3 hours

This course rotates topics in philosophical studies, including but not limited to Culture and Identity; mythologies in Human Experience; the History and Philosophy of Scientific Exploration; and Atheism, Agnosticism, and Skepticism. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Offered Fall



HUM533 Studies in Social, Human and Political Sciences ........................................3 hours

This course rotates topics in social and human sciences in the fields of psychology, sociology, political science, and anthropology, including but not limited to Development of Government Systems and Social Practice: How People Behave and Why.  This course may be cross-listed with appropriate courses in the School Business and the School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Offered Spring



HUM680 Capstone Project ..............................................................................3 hours

This course, co-taught by two faculty members from different fields, is available for students who wish to complete their course of study with a capstone project.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 21 hours of graduate level coursework.


Offered Fall, Spring, Summer

HUM681 Comprehensive Exams ..............................................................................3 hours

This course, co-taught by two faculty members from different fields, is available to students who wish to complete their course of study at Tiffin University with a comprehensive exam.  Due to the nature of this course – because it culminates in a two-week timed exam – students cannot take a grade of “I” under any circumstance.  Students may withdraw if necessary and retake the course when able.

Offered Fall, Spring, Summer